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Wine whip with immersion chiller question

Lately I have been using my wine whip with my immersion chiller to kill two birds with one stone, so to speak. I figured after boil, I can oxygenate and rapidly chill my wort at the same time. At my last brew club meeting, one of my fellow more experience brewers said that this method could cause long term oxidation problems. I have been turning out good light beers with this method, but he said that my longer aged beers could show problems with oxygenating at higher temps. Has anyone else had issues with this or additional insight?

I guess I don’t understand his reasoning. You have to oxygenate before you add yeast. I do basically the same thing with a paint stirrer on a ceiling fan motor.i’ve never had any problems.

Generally, the ROT is that if the wort is over 85F you risk oxidation by adding air to it. If you start using your whip after that point, you’ll be fine. If you use it before, run it very slowly to avoid whipping air into the wort.

Now that was what I was told, but I have been vigorously whipping it directly after flame out. I haven’t noticed any off flavors in any of my beers yet, so wanted to see what people had to say.

Now that was what I was told, but I have been vigorously whipping it directly after flame out. I haven’t noticed any off flavors in any of my beers yet, so wanted to see what people had to say.[/quote]

It takes a while for staleness due to oxidation to develop, so maybe you drink the beer within a couple months before it gets bad. Or maybe you’re so used to the flavor you don’t notice it. Or maybe it isn’t happening. At any rate, my approach would be to be careful just in case.

Guess I should have added, I don’t crank up the stirrer until it gets around 120 or less.

Not sure where I read this, but I recalled dropping it to or below 140* was the magic temperature to avoid hot-side aeration/oxidation

those whips do not do a good job of oxygenating. You would be better of shaking

Sorry, but my experience is exactly the opposite.

Sorry, but my experience is exactly the opposite.[/quote]

Not with mine experience. I used to use them to and saw no improvement as compared with other ways. A few testings I have seen online also show low oxygen from actually being tested.
After all they are Degassers…

Sorry, but my experience is exactly the opposite.[/quote]

Not with mine experience. I used to use them to and saw no improvement as compared with other ways. A few testings I have seen online also show low oxygen from actually being tested.
After all they are Degassers…[/quote]

They are degassers if you have CO2 to be removed from wine. But they also incorporate air into the wort.

They are degassers if you have CO2 to be removed from wine. But they also incorporate air into the wort.[/quote]

not much by the readings I have seen, shaking produced more oxygen than one of those on the results

I always get copious amounts of foam when I use my mix stir. I’m confident that wouldn’t happen unless they were introducing a lot of air to the wort.

so did I, but saw no improvement in fermentations vs other oxygenating techniques and the tests do not show a great absorption of oxygen

But you did see an improvement with shaking the fermenter? That seems odd, but I say do whatever works for you. I’ll keep using the mix-stir until I run into issues. I’m always worried about breakage shaking a glass carboy.

I was shaking before the mixstir and saw no improvement using the mixstir, actually fermentation seemed to suffer or maybe the same but no improvement for sure. I could shake longer and saw improvement but nothing with the mixstir.
The dissolved o2 tests I heard online backed it up to so I stopped. Saw a vast improvment with a 40 or 50 dollar investment to o2, and a mixstir was damn near the same price so a waste of money IMO
I guess I would be more worried using the mixstir and cracking the glass but thats me, I have scrapped a few buckets and BB’s with the mixstir that may have crakced if it was glass.

so did I, but saw no improvement in fermentations vs other oxygenating techniques and the tests do not show a great absorption of oxygen[/quote]

If you look at the oxygenation article on the Wyeast website, it appears that the MixStir is equal to shaking the fermenter. Both provide about 8 ppm O2, which is optimal.

so did I, but saw no improvement in fermentations vs other oxygenating techniques and the tests do not show a great absorption of oxygen[/quote]

If you look at the oxygenation article on the Wyeast website, it appears that the MixStir is equal to shaking the fermenter. Both provide about 8 ppm O2, which is optimal.[/quote]

Thanks, I just saw no improvement and actually longer lag times, and whichever podcast had the testing showed the opposite of wyeast, although I would take wyeast data over it all…and for the price of one of them wish I would have just went to the 02 setup for 10 more bucks from the start.
Saw a dramatic increase in beer quality when I went to 02.

[quote=“grainbelt”]Thanks, I just saw no improvement and actually longer lag times, and whichever podcast had the testing showed the opposite of wyeast, although I would take wyeast data over it all…and for the price of one of them wish I would have just went to the 02 setup for 10 more bucks from the start.
Saw a dramatic increase in beer quality when I went to 02.[/quote]

Whatever works for ya! I found no improvement using O2 over the MixStir. The MixStir cost me less than half the price and I don’t have to buy refills for it! :wink:

[quote=“Denny”][quote=“grainbelt”]Thanks, I just saw no improvement and actually longer lag times, and whichever podcast had the testing showed the opposite of wyeast, although I would take wyeast data over it all…and for the price of one of them wish I would have just went to the 02 setup for 10 more bucks from the start.
Saw a dramatic increase in beer quality when I went to 02.[/quote]

Whatever works for ya! I found no improvement using O2 over the MixStir. The MixStir cost me less than half the price and I don’t have to buy refills for it! :wink: [/quote]

just keep a spare battery charged for your drill :cheers:

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