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Sugar cubes for priming?

According to Northern Brewer’s priming sugar calculator and my math, 50 cubes of Domino brand sugar cubes should furnish 2.5 volumes of carbonation when bottled at 68 F or about one cube per bottle.

Has anyone ever tried this?

If my math is correct, it should be an easy way to add priming sugar.

Is the difference between for instance between 2.5 volumes of carb and 2.2 volumes of carbonation that noticeable?

Thanks in advance for your reply.

Really hoping for a reply on this. I’m often way too lazy to pull up a priming calculator and think this sounds like a fine idea. If you try this, report back…

Yes, this is done. I’m reading that brewers will use 1 Dominos cube per 12 oz bottle. Two cubes for a 22 oz bottle. Under perfect conditions, the difference between 2.2 volumes and 2.5 volumes could be noticeable. There are many variables though, temp of the beer, vigor of the pour, style of the beer glass, etc.

my only question would be would the cube fully dissolve? This sounds like a great idea though otherwise, particularly if the cubes are of relatively similar weight.

What about the difference between sucrose(table/cane sugar-unsure about fermentability) and dextrose(corn sugar-which I know to be fully fermentable). Whenever I bottle, I’ve only used dex. About the cubes though, any worries about infection?, they just package them in cardboard cartons. I would be iffy about using them.

Cheers!

[quote=“The Fhunt”]What about the difference between sucrose(table/cane sugar-unsure about fermentability) and dextrose(corn sugar-which I know to be fully fermentable). Whenever I bottle, I’ve only used dex. About the cubes though, any worries about infection?, they just package them in cardboard cartons. I would be iffy about using them.

Cheers![/quote]
Sucrose is composed of a glucose molecule attached to a fructose molecule. The yeast need to break these apart to use them, which will slow down the process a bit, but they are even more fermentable in the end. You should use about 5% less sucrose for priming than you would dextrose to get the same level of carbonation.

If I add sugar directly to a bottle, which I do occasionally to fill a few while I’m putting the bulk of my beer in a keg, I’ll just weigh the sugar and add it dry to the bottles. Been doing this for some years now, and haven’t gotten an infection yet. Not many microbes can survive on pure, dry sugar.

I have done this on my last ten or twelve batches with no problems.

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