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Reducing harshness with dark grain late additions

My beers have a apparent harshness once they’re in the keg for about a month and the aroma hops tend to fade.

I’ve read from several brew veterans that they have been adding their dark grains later in the mash, not right at the beginning.

I’m going to try a path Beersk mentions which is to set my water profile for an amber balanced in Bru’n water so it results in 5.5 at room temp. Then add the dark grains with 20 minutes left. Then also recheck the PH. I realize there maybe a slight reduction in flavor from this action but if this helps I’ll adjust the grain amount.

I’m interested in reading what other brewer use as their approach. Anyone do something different?

If I do a late addition, it is usually just for color. I have done this with alts and recently an attempt at a Southern Brown Ale. I usually use my dark grains for the full mash if I am making a porter or stout. I use an appropriate water profile so that my pH does not go too low and I don’t have any off flavors. You could also have an small infection in your beers that takes a while to show up. I have had this happen a few times.

I have had a few beers made with a cold steeped dark grain, and it was very aromatic. If you like over the top chocolate or roast, you may want to try this. I have not done it myself though. I tasted these at club meetings.

Thanks SA Brew. I’ve been following the other thread from Beersk with the keg/beer taste. I’m going to be deep cleaning the kegs when they kick.

Just bought a scale last night to use for water adjustments additions. I’m going to get away from the teaspoon addition water adjustments just in case my estimates are off.

The scale will be a good addition, but I’m also hoping that you know what is in your tap water so you know how much you can get away with adding. That is an important factor.

Enjoy!

[quote=“Waszup”]My beers have a apparent harshness once they’re in the keg for about a month and the aroma hops tend to fade.

I’ve read from several brew veterans that they have been adding their dark grains later in the mash, not right at the beginning.

I’m going to try a path Beersk mentions which is to set my water profile for an amber balanced in Bru’n water so it results in 5.5 at room temp. Then add the dark grains with 20 minutes left. Then also recheck the PH. I realize there maybe a slight reduction in flavor from this action but if this helps I’ll adjust the grain amount.

I’m interested in reading what other brewer use as their approach. Anyone do something different?[/quote]

Which dark grains? Some are harsher than others.

Doesn’t it seem strange to anyone else that this pops up after a month?

I often add most or all of the dark grains during the (batch) sparge only.

Same here. All dark specialty malts are added at sparge time.
It makes a big difference.

The dark grains used would be crystal 120 and Special B. I do have my water profile entered into Bru’n Water. Thanks for the replies.

Just to be clear, the harshness develops after a month or is it unveiled after the hops fade? I typically find that my beers with a high proportion of “dark” grains tend to mellow over time. I have heard Jamil explain it as the extra fine grain particulates are still in suspension when the beer young, lending a “harsh” flavor component, as it ages they drop out of suspension thus making the beer taste less harsh. When you say it develops after a month or so it makes me think infection.

I’ve never experienced “harshness” from C120 or Special B. Black patent, yeah.

I’ve never experienced “harshness” from C120 or Special B. Black patent, yeah.[/quote]

THIS^^^^^

I think that something else is the cause, between this and the fact that it doesn’t develop til later.

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