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Paralysis by analysis

Not necessarily. If your projected lauter efficiency is within a few percent of your overall mash efficiency, then the only way to improve it would be to increase lauter efficiency. And that may not be desirable.

Not necessarily. If your projected lauter efficiency is within a few percent of your overall mash efficiency, then the only way to improve it would be to increase lauter efficiency. And that may not be desirable.[/quote]
I’m getting confused with the difference between the two. Like I said before, I’m pretty happy with consistent 70-74% efficiency. Just thought it was strange I never saw a huge jump when I bought my own mill. And everyone is saying they’re getting like 80% when things they’re doing don’t seem any different to what I’m doing. I’m curious. So if anything, that’s the reason why I’m researching this. Not because I’m upset I’m not getting the efficiency everyone else seems to be getting.

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?ti ... Efficiency
http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?ti ... Efficiency[/quote]

Thanks, Kai is pretty awesome. I’ve actually been reading that page for the last couple days, trying to figure stuff out. Would there be any difference between a bazooka screen and a braided hose? I’m thinking that may make a difference for using adjuncts like oats, or no?

Anyway, I’m going to try mashing thinner.

[quote=“Beersk”]Would there be any difference between a bazooka screen and a braided hose? I’m thinking that may make a difference for using adjuncts like oats, or no?
[/quote]

Based on my (batch sparging) experience, I would guess that a bazooka screen would be less likely to result in a stuck sparge. If the grain bed is actually the filter–and not the braid/manifold device–then the bazooka screen, with its larger openings, would be less likely to become plugged.

Some of the variability can come from slightly different underlying assumptions for yield in points per pound if you don’t have accurate malt analysis. Small variations in assumed yield rate significantly change efficiency calculation results. Variations in measurement techniques can also provide measurable changes to calculated efficiency.

[quote=“Silentknyght”][quote=“Beersk”]Would there be any difference between a bazooka screen and a braided hose? I’m thinking that may make a difference for using adjuncts like oats, or no?
[/quote]

Based on my (batch sparging) experience, I would guess that a bazooka screen would be less likely to result in a stuck sparge. If the grain bed is actually the filter–and not the braid/manifold device–then the bazooka screen, with its larger openings, would be less likely to become plugged.[/quote]
I wonder…because I’ve gotten bad stuck sparges with it using 10% oats. I usually have to scrape on the screen to get the wort flowing out. So I think the bigger openings get gummed up. I should probably mash thinner, also.

@Brewbeer22: this is possible. I may have more deadspace in my mash tun than I realize with the screen. It hangs out an inch above the bottom. I usually try to tilt the mash tun to get the wort out, but maybe that doesn’t help much. Who knows. 70% is okay with me, just curious why I don’t get the 80% efficiency like Denny or anyone else. I pay fairly close attention to water, that’s important I think.

hey Beersk,
Nice Hyjack, I was hoping for encouragement, a pat on the back, and someone to hold my hand and tell me everything was going to workout.
Well, Saturday is the day and I’m going to go with the NB all grain recipe as they recommend. The more I thought about this how can I even know whats going to happen until I do a couple batches. Am I right?
When you talk about a low efficiency are you still making a drinkable beer? How does this effect the final product? Thanks for all the feedback, but I’m still so uptight about Saturday i kicked the wife out to help paint the interior of our Son’s new house. I can cuss, swear, spill, screw up in private.
PS The dog hasn’t ratted me out yet.

Hey man, sorry about that…

Anyway, the 70% efficiency I get definitely yields drinkable beer. My beer is pretty good I think. Just been curious why I never saw a huge jump in efficiency like others did. It’s been discussed to death here, most agree that as long as your efficiency is consistent, that’s all that matters.
Good luck with your first all grain brew. You’ll be running around like mad trying to figure out what to do next, but you’ll get it down after a couple batches. I’m always tweaking my process here and there, so it’s an ever evolving process.

Sorry again for the thread hijack.

no need to apologize, I enjoy how these thresds can take a life of their own. Just remeber if you see a mushroom cloud to the east tommorow it’s just me brewin.

Haha, don’t blow yourself up.

One thing I haven’t been doing that I used to do (and I plan to start doing it again) is measuring out my grains and milling them the night before. You probably don’t have your own mill yet, but once you get one, that saves time on brew day.

I have yet to get efficiency above 70% on a reliable basis, but my first two all grains came out GREAT. I mean, really, I’m stunned by how good they taste. First one had efficiency of 71%, second had 63%.

One critical lesson I learned the first time, though, is to check efficiency before the boil. That way, if your extraction rate is significantly lower than you assumed it would be when configuring your recipe, and you don’t have extract on hand, you can recalculate hops additions to maintain target balance.

[quote=“Silentknyght”][quote=“Beersk”]Would there be any difference between a bazooka screen and a braided hose? I’m thinking that may make a difference for using adjuncts like oats, or no?
[/quote]

Based on my (batch sparging) experience, I would guess that a bazooka screen would be less likely to result in a stuck sparge. If the grain bed is actually the filter–and not the braid/manifold device–then the bazooka screen, with its larger openings, would be less likely to become plugged.[/quote]

I’ve had the opposite experience. The Bazooka clogged and my braid didn’t.

[quote=“Denny”][quote=“Silentknyght”][quote=“Beersk”]Would there be any difference between a bazooka screen and a braided hose? I’m thinking that may make a difference for using adjuncts like oats, or no?
[/quote]

Based on my (batch sparging) experience, I would guess that a bazooka screen would be less likely to result in a stuck sparge. If the grain bed is actually the filter–and not the braid/manifold device–then the bazooka screen, with its larger openings, would be less likely to become plugged.[/quote]

I’ve had the opposite experience. The Bazooka clogged and my braid didn’t.[/quote]
This is what I was wondering…I’m thinking about putting a braid in my mash tun. I read somewhere that someone had issues with rusting on the hose clamps. Supposedly they were stainless steel. That’s holding me back…

[quote=“Beersk”]
This is what I was wondering…I’m thinking about putting a braid in my mash tun. I read somewhere that someone had issues with rusting on the hose clamps. Supposedly they were stainless steel. That’s holding me back…[/quote]

I haven’t found that to present a problem. Mine are a bit rusted but I replace them every few years.

Thanks, Denny. :slight_smile:
I think I’ll try it out. Just need a 1/2" barb for my bulkhead and I’m set. Oh and hack sawing off the ends of the hose. That might be somewhat of a challenge.

It’s actually pretty easy. I was able to do it with a pair of high quality shears that came with our knives. Took some effort, but I imagine a hacksaw would cut through it like butter if you can keep it still on either side of the blade.

When I bought the braid at the hardware store I asked the clerk to cut off the ends. He used the same shears that they use for cutting chain. I won’t talk about how fun it was to remove the plastic tube from the inside. What a pain in the arse.

I figured out an easy way to do that, too.

Once the ends are cut off, place a pair of needle nose within easy reach.

Use one hand to hold the hose at about the midpoint and use your other hand to grab the hose near one of the ends. Now, pull the braid towards your first hand exposing as much of the inner tube as possible. Use your first hand to bring the center of the tube to the palm of your second hand and use the latter to hold the hose in place. The idea here is to prevent the braid from expanding back over the exposed inner tube.

With the hose secure in one hand, use the other to grab the needle nose pliers and then use them to hold the exposed inner tubing. Do this in such a way that the pliers are perpendicular to the length of the hose, e.g., if they were scissors, you’d be able to cut the end of the hose off. Make sure the side of the pliers is firmly flush with the cut end of the braid.

Now, use your second hand to push the hose up towards the pliers. The braid should stay put and contract, allowing the inner tube to slide out fairly easily. Once enough of the inner tube is exposed, grab it with your free hand (the one with out the pliers) and hold it in place while you use the pliers to push the braid the rest of the way off.

It’s hard to describe, but once you get the hang of it, it’s very easy.

So I’ve heard…those Chinese finger traps will get ya. And watch out for the Cross Dressing Amateurs (CDA’s) too.

[quote=“ickyfoot”]
It’s hard to describe, but once you get the hang of it, it’s very easy.[/quote]
I’d imagine you’re really only needing to do this once, unless you like building mash tuns a lot.

I appreciate the instructions though.

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