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OG 1047 with US05...potential ABV?

NB’s American Amber Ale brewed according to the recipe and mash temp…with let’s say 75% efficiency…What ABV would you expect? Would you consider this to be a “light beer” and “watery”? It seems like it could be a real crowd pleaser but will my beer snob friends think it’s weak? At what OG do you consider beers going from light to medium bodied…generally speaking.

Maybe another way to phrase the question is…if you ordered a pint of this at a craft beer bar for $5, would you think it’s a decent value?

4.6-4.7% ABV. I wouldn’t think this beer would be light or watery. Light and watery comes into play more where the OG is <1.045, and/or where your final gravity falls below 1.008, something like that. But even a well made saison at a final gravity of 1.002 does NOT taste thin and watery. Maybe because it’s so full of character. Numbers can be deceiving. What really matters is how it tastes. Perception and numerical values sometimes/often do not agree.

Typically I would not pay $5 for a standard pint of beer. Maybe a Belgian or a really strong ale I would. Going rate around these parts is around $3-$4 a pint. Personally when faced with paying premium prices at a bar or picking up a 6-pack for $7-$8 and drinking at home, I’ll choose the latter. Others go the other way more often. Personal preference. But $5 for just about any beer is… a lot. I mean, that’s a big markup. Your typical all-grain beer only costs 50 cents to a dollar to make. Sure, in a commercial setting you’ve got to pay all the overhead. But $5 is a bit steep except maybe for the biggest cities like NYC or LA or something like that, where the cost of living just all-around sucks.

P.S. Ooh, I just hit 3333 posts! Yippie! :mrgreen:

I find it difficult to believe that a homebrew shop’s American amber, brewed correctly, could be taken as watery or weak.

If you’re afraid of seeming weak in today’s abv arms race, just dial back your carbonation a bit. It’s a hell of a lot cheaper and you can have an extra pint each night for having brewed a bit smaller and less gassy.

I agree with Dave, as 1.045 is a great session beer. Probably in the middle. Much is depending on the style of the beer. I make this size gravity a lot [ up to 1.050 ] for get togethers and people enjoy these beers without getting wiped out. I’m not familiar with the craft micro scene so I can’t reply. Just brew at home to satisfy friends and family, and occaisionally pick up stuff at the liquor store.

I’m in suburban CT and pints here at bars/resturants are $6-$8 for standard beers, more for premium craft beers (IIPAs, Imperial Stouts) and approaching $2/oz for sours! Most of the time this isn’t even for a real pint, I’m talking about a 14oz tumbler! There are a few bars that do decent happy hours, which is usually $2 off. I’m still paying $5 for a Stone IPA in that case.

Even our local (big) brewery charges $6 at the brewery!

I guess I’m spoiled, living in 'Sconsin. :slight_smile:

[quote=“Wahoo”][quote=“dmtaylo2”]
Typically I would not pay $5 for a standard pint of beer. Maybe a Belgian or a really strong ale I would. Going rate around these parts is around $3-$4 a pint. Personally when faced with paying premium prices at a bar or picking up a 6-pack for $7-$8 and drinking at home, I’ll choose the latter. Others go the other way more often. Personal preference. But $5 for just about any beer is… a lot. I mean, that’s a big markup. Your typical all-grain beer only costs 50 cents to a dollar to make. Sure, in a commercial setting you’ve got to pay all the overhead. But $5 is a bit steep except maybe for the biggest cities like NYC or LA or something like that, where the cost of living just all-around sucks.

[/quote]

I’m in suburban CT and pints here at bars/resturants are $6-$8 for standard beers, more for premium craft beers (IIPAs, Imperial Stouts) and approaching $2/oz for sours! Most of the time this isn’t even for a real pint, I’m talking about a 14oz tumbler! There are a few bars that do decent happy hours, which is usually $2 off. I’m still paying $5 for a Stone IPA in that case.

Even our local (big) brewery charges $6 at the brewery![/quote]

I live in Kalamazoo MI so I am spoiled with having Bells Brewery right down the road from me and they are about $5-$6 on average a pint so middle of the road I guess for some high quality beer.

I live in Southern Indiana where most eateries have only a limited selection or no true craft brews and what they have is $4.50 to $7/ pint so I mostly brew and consume at home.

Since I prefer beer with less hops than is currently fashionable and also like brown ales served in iced mugs as cold as possible, I’m much happier drinking my own stuff for about $.80/pint.

Not claiming to be a great brewer, just enjoy what I make more than some of the hoppy stuff that’s served too warm for my tastes.

Drinking: Porter and Stout
Bottle conditioning a Red Ale

wisconsin is very much in the 4-6 dollar range, maybe some small town out of the way will have stuff cheaper but almost every state has that

I’m from CT also and that sounds steep to me. You must be in lower Fairfield county. Try O’Conner’s in Brookfield. Lagunita IPA and SN ruthless rye $3.50 all day till six then they go up to $5.

[quote=“tony269”]I live in Kalamazoo MI so I am spoiled with having Bells Brewery right down the road from me and they are about $5-$6 on average a pint so middle of the road I guess for some high quality beer.[/quote]I wonder if you were lucky enough to score some of the ~600 cases of Black Note Stout that they sold in out in 36 hours. I showed up a few days late and missed it but I still have 12 from 2012.

Where? Milwaukee? Madison? Wisconsin is a much bigger state than just Milwaukee and Madison.

Where? Milwaukee? Madison? Wisconsin is a much bigger state than just Milwaukee and Madison.[/quote]

All over. Mostly 5-6 bucks happy hours are in the 2-4 range.

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