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Minneapolis Water for brewing?

I’ve got a question or three… I know a lot of you live in and around Minneapolis. I just started brewing AG a few weeks ago (1 botched batch under my belt), and I’m tired of buying RO water at the store to brew with. I’ve got a buddy that lives in NE Mpls, and I’ve heard that Mpls water is good for brewing. I figured I’d stop by his house and fill up water jugs and save some $$ (off of a non-softened spigot, of course)

So on to the question part…

  1. Is it true? Is it good for brewing?
  2. If so, what additions do you have or suggest for brewing pale ales/IPAs? or any other style for that matter? CaCl, gypsum, etc.
  3. What color is blue?

Yeah from what I gather our water here is pretty good for brewing. I haven’t really got into water chemistry, mostly because I don’t think I need to, and I think that unless you are trying to recreate a historical style like a specific English Bitter or something like Guinness where the water affects the end product you shouldn’t mess with it. That is unless you don’t have good water available and you have to become a mini home chemist.

I’ll have to fill up some Better Bottles at my buddy’s house then and not worry :slight_smile:

I’ve got well water at my place that is stinky high in iron unless it’s super softened.

Nordeast Love :cheers:

I’ve been brewing for about 30 years. Started as a senior in high school (back when 18 was legal). The three biggest improvements to my beer, were in order:

  1. Going all grain
  2. Temperature control
  3. Water adjustments

I live in western Wisconsin where we have very high bi-carbonates. I use Bru’n water and dilute my existing water with RO water, and normally add salts to emulate the balanced profile for the SRM of the beer I’m making… Dark beers are diluted up to appoximately 20%, and light beers are diluted up to 80%. The water for each beer I make is adjusted through the spreadsheet. You can then make the beer again and adjust the water if you feel they style should be more malty, or hoppy.

I have made hundreds of beers over the years. I have honestly enjoyed them all because I made them myself. I would find out the profile of the water in that area (in Wisconsin we can get the information from the DNR annual reports), and make beers that the water is suitable for. If you want to make styles that are lighter, or darker, you can then adjust the water with either RO water, or salt adjustments. At the end of the day, you decide if you like the beer your making.

[quote=“homebrew4us”]I’ve been brewing for about 30 years. Started as a senior in high school (back when 18 was legal). The three biggest improvements to my beer, were in order:

  1. Going all grain
  2. Temperature control
  3. Water adjustments

I live in western Wisconsin where we have very high bi-carbonates. I use Bru’n water and dilute my existing water with RO water, and normally add salts to emulate the balanced profile for the SRM of the beer I’m making… Dark beers are diluted up to appoximately 20%, and light beers are diluted up to 80%. The water for each beer I make is adjusted through the spreadsheet. You can then make the beer again and adjust the water if you feel they style should be more malty, or hoppy.

I have made hundreds of beers over the years. I have honestly enjoyed them all because I made them myself. I would find out the profile of the water in that area (in Wisconsin we can get the information from the DNR annual reports), and make beers that the water is suitable for. If you want to make styles that are lighter, or darker, you can then adjust the water with either RO water, or salt adjustments. At the end of the day, you decide if you like the beer your making.[/quote]

I’d agree that in the long run this might not be a bad idea for improving your quality but the way you laid it out the original poster is just on botched step into your first step for improving beer so I’d still say that if they can avoid the issue while nailing down process they should do it.

I’ll find out just how botched it was tonight when I sample a little of it… I kegged it up and am ready to check it out. I’m sure it may be a little green, but at least I’ll have a baseline to go off of. And I know where I screwed up on brew day, so I can correct that easily next time.

I’ve got temperature control down, my fermentation “room” stays at about 64 degrees most of the year and has been great for all the extract brews I’ve done.

The water piece was the one I was most worried about, really. Eventually, I’ll install an RO filtration system in the house, but $$ says not right now.

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