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Irish stout question

I am going to brew an Irish stout recipe next week as my 2nd all grain and am excited about it. My local home brew shop only has roasted barley 595 ( instead of 300) and chocolate malt 450 ( instead of 350). Anyone know if this will change the flavor adversely or just color?

Recipe:

6.00 lb Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 64.86 %
1.00 lb Barley, Flaked (1.7 SRM) Grain 10.81 %
1.00 lb Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) Grain 10.81 %
0.75 lb Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM) Grain 8.11 %
0.50 lb Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM) Grain 5.41 %
1.00 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %] (60 min) Hops 17.2 IBU

Thanks, t

[quote=“Trapae”]I am going to brew an Irish stout recipe next week as my 2nd all grain and am excited about it. My local home brew shop only has roasted barley 595 ( instead of 300) and chocolate malt 450 ( instead of 350). Anyone know if this will change the flavor adversely or just color?
Recipe:
6.00 lb Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 64.86 %
1.00 lb Barley, Flaked (1.7 SRM) Grain 10.81 %
1.00 lb Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) Grain 10.81 %
0.75 lb Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM) Grain 8.11 %
0.50 lb Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM) Grain 5.41 %
1.00 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %] (60 min) Hops 17.2 IBU Thanks, t[/quote]

I don’t think it will do a lot to the flavor, but will add some color which isn’t a big deal for a stout, in my book.

As mentioned above, the effect on color is probably a larger factor than flavor. But, by the time beer color gets to the upper 20’s, color is relatively constant. Don’t worry too much about the change in malt specifications.

Stout is a great choice for a second all-grain. Very easy to get right. Don’t see a problem with the darkness of the roasted grains.

Where did you get this recipe? Not bad, but if it were me I would tweek it a bit.

I really don’t see a need for Carapils at all. Again, just my oppinion. I’d scrap that and up the flaked barley. If a little malt sweetness is what you are going for you could always add a little crystal malt, but I don’t tend to myself.

That is quite a bit of roast grain. Really don’t need that much to get everything out of them. I’d go max %10 between both the Raost and Chocolate.

Your on the right track with the hops, but I’d just add a little more. The dry Irish style can go as high as 40-50 IBUs. 17 seems low to me. I’d go at least 25-30 myself (again just what I would do.)

Recipe was from Home Brew Talk -O Flannagain’s. Got good reviews so I thought I’d try it. So I adjusted it as follow upping the Flaked barley, and hops, and decreasing the carapils and chocolate malt. I also scaled it to 5.5gal. I didn’t know carapils adds sweetness, thought it didn’t give any flavor? Any opinions on the new recipe:

6 lbs 9.7 oz Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 1 66.2 %
1 lbs 8.0 oz Barley, Flaked (1.7 SRM) Grain 2 15.0 %
13.1 oz Roasted Barley (595.0 SRM) Grain 3 8.2 %
12.0 oz Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) Grain 4 7.5 %
4.8 oz Chocolate Malt (450.0 SRM) Grain 5 3.0 %
1.50 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %] - Boil 60.0 Hop 6 27.6 IBUs
1.1 pkg Irish Ale Yeast (White Labs #WLP004) Yeast 7 -

Thanks,
T

I would definately drink that.
Your recipe source seems good, so if people liked it go for it.
I still don’t get the Carapils (but maybe someone who has used it in a stout could chime in.) You get tons body and head retention from the Flaked Barley. Seems redundant to me. But if it worked for this recipe I certainly can’t see it having a negative effect.

Everything else looks great to me. 15% flaked is definately going to have a noticable impact. The roasted malts are not going to be too overpowering.
I like that bitterness. I’ve done a few in the higher range (40-50 IBUs) and found it too much for me. I think yours would be dead on to my taste.

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