Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

FWH opinion

New brewer here and about to get a batch going this afternoon. I’ve been doing some studying on the FWH technique and wonder if anyone has an opinion based on personal experience. I have another post already about this brew but was mainly for questions about the Grain but it spiraled away, in a good way.

My question here is about the FWH technique and pro’s and con’s of changes that I have made.

(My recipe from last night)
5.5gal batch
12lb Briess Pale Ale
1.5lb Caramel 60
(all pellet hops
1oz Millenium [15.3%]: FWH(90-80 min)
1oz Centennial: (20 min)
1oz Crystal: (0 min)
1oz Crystal: DH

After researching last night and this morning I only see anyone using a high alpha hop for a FWH addition. However I do see where (people have said) the FWH technique does mellow out the bitterness a bit while at the same time adds about 10% to the overall IBU calculation. Because of what I have researched I am inclined to change it to something like this instead:

(My revised recipe)
5.5gal batch
12lb Briess Pale Ale
1.5lb Caramel 60
(all pellet hops
1oz Millenium: FWH(90-80 min)
1oz Centennial: FWH(90-80 min)
1oz Crystal: (0 min)
1oz Crystal: DH

I know, in a lot of ways, it comes down to a personal preference but this is only my 8th batch so I’ve not quite developed that yet. The main insight I am looking for now is my keeping the High Alpha as a FWH. (From my research the Centennial seems a perfect choice for this technique.)

Thanks

The general rule of thumb regarding FWH is that it contributes about the same bittering as the same hops as a 20 minute addition.

Without digging too deeply into the numbers, this would probably put your beer at <50IBUs. It would also make the recipe similar to a “hopburst”, which is little to no bittering hops but a ton of hops in the last 20 minutes or so of the boil.

As far as the type of hops to use for FWH, I think it’s safe to go with anything that you’d use as a flavor hop. I haven’t used Millenium, but it’s supposed to be similar to Columbus or Nugget, which depending on your tastes would probably work. I suspect it’s on the harsher end of the scale, but would certainly provide some “bite” and lingering hop presence long after the swallow. I kinda like that, but not everyone does.

Anyway, just my 2 cents. Your results may vary, but I think these are generally agreed-upon perceptions…

I would recommend a 60 min, addition along with the FWH. Use FWH for flavor, and consider the bittering you get from them secondarily. I have FWH hundreds of batches and still use a 60 min. addition on every one of them.

Split the Millenium and Centennial 50/50 for both FWH and Boil? I actually split them the first time I used them but was at 60 & 30 on the boil but what did I know right?

I was also thinking FWH the Centennial and 60 on the Millenium as the centennial has a lot more aroma/flavor potential than the Millenium.

EDIT-Alright, I am committed now…FWH is in

5.5gal batch
12lb Briess Pale Ale
1.5lb Caramel 60
(all pellet hops)
1oz Centennial: FWH(90-80 min)
1oz Millenium: (60 min)
1oz Crystal: (0 min)
1oz Crystal: DH

I bet I drink it all…

That will definitely work, and is certainly the more conventional choice :slight_smile: . I bet the citrus punch you’ll get from the Centennial will go very well with the more subtle Crystal aroma.

Let us know how it turns out!

Split the Millenium and Centennial 50/50 for both FWH and Boil? I actually split them the first time I used them but was at 60 & 30 on the boil but what did I know right?

I was also thinking FWH the Centennial and 60 on the Millenium as the centennial has a lot more aroma/flavor potential than the Millenium.

EDIT-Alright, I am committed now…FWH is in

5.5gal batch
12lb Briess Pale Ale
1.5lb Caramel 60
(all pellet hops)
1oz Centennial: FWH(90-80 min)
1oz Millenium: (60 min)
1oz Crystal: (0 min)
1oz Crystal: DH

I bet I drink it all…[/quote]

I like that

For my house IPA which I have made over a dozen times, I use FWH and hop bursting but no traditional bittering hops. Since you get IBU’s from both sources the bitterness is definitely there.

Play around with the numbers but there is no need for traditional bittering hops. As stated above it’s all about preference.

I FWH a lot of my beers, even light lagers. I agree that other hop additions are beneficial as Denny says, but I often skip the 60 minute add without adverse effect when FWH’ing.

It depends on the style IMO. Light lager, sure. AIPA, not so much.

Having my first glass and it turned out great in the bitter/flavor department. I ended up just dumping the 2oz of crystal at flame out and did not get the wort cooled off fast enough as my hose froze and could not use my chiller so thinking I lost some of the aroma from the crystal.

It was a little big for one pack of S-05 so after what seemed too quick of a fermentation I dumped some Nottingham reclaimed out of a Haus Pale and that finished it off nicely, maybe even a little to dry. I think next time I would use Nottingham instead of 05.

Going for my second glass.

Thanks for all the advice

It depends on the style IMO. Light lager, sure. AIPA, not so much.[/quote]

Agreed, Denny.

[quote=“SkyHigh”]Having my first glass and it turned out great in the bitter/flavor department. I ended up just dumping the 2oz of crystal at flame out and did not get the wort cooled off fast enough as my hose froze and could not use my chiller so thinking I lost some of the aroma from the crystal.

It was a little big for one pack of S-05 so after what seemed too quick of a fermentation I dumped some Nottingham reclaimed out of a Haus Pale and that finished it off nicely, maybe even a little to dry. I think next time I would use Nottingham instead of 05.

Going for my second glass.

Thanks for all the advice[/quote]

Glad it went well. Actually, quite an astute question by a “newer” brewer. Keep asking questions, because often others are afraid to ask or perhaps don’t think to ask and we all learn when a guy like Denny or similarly-situated experienced homebrewers give insight!

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com