Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Fly or Batch - which do you do?

If I only had a penny… :wink:

I humorously say the same thing about general science stuff. My wife and I are chemists. like you said, If only a penny for every odd question :slight_smile:

If you had a penny for every dollar you’d saved someone else, you’d still be a saint. Just a very wealthy one. :smiley:

[quote=“Denny”]If I only had a penny… :wink: [/quote]for every time a thread pops up with this heading “batch vs fly?”

[quote=“MullerBrau”][quote=“Denny”]If I only had a penny… :wink: [/quote]for every time a thread pops up with this heading “batch vs fly?”[/quote]Or, “Aluminum vs. SS Kettles”

[quote=“Glug Master”][quote=“MullerBrau”][quote=“Denny”]If I only had a penny… :wink: [/quote]for every time a thread pops up with this heading “batch vs fly?”[/quote]Or, “Aluminum vs. SS Kettles”[/quote]Or how old are you. LOL

Fly…after this post I just may try batch…

Please try it and report back.

I get the ease part of batch sparging. I remain unconvinced that batch sparging saves appreciable time. That mass drains quickly and needs to heat when batch sparging, adding 200 degree water to your 150ish degree mash or otherwise, whereas I’m slowly heating all the way to the top of my kettle when I fly sparge (also with 200 degree water). I struggle to see an appreciable difference, but I have an open mind to being wrong. Wouldn’t be the first time. I do want to get my brain around this.

I fly sparge for less than an hour, more like 40-45 minutes. I’m in the 80’s for efficiency.

Please try it and report back.

I get the ease part of batch sparging. I remain unconvinced that batch sparging saves appreciable time. That mass drains quickly and needs to heat when batch sparging, adding 200 degree water to your 150ish degree mash or otherwise, whereas I’m slowly heating all the way to the top of my kettle when I fly sparge (also with 200 degree water). I struggle to see an appreciable difference, but I have an open mind to being wrong. Wouldn’t be the first time. I do want to get my brain around this.

I fly sparge for less than an hour, more like 40-45 minutes. I’m in the 80’s for efficiency.[/quote]
If you drain the runnings directly into your kettle and start heating as soon as you have the bottom covered (I’ve sometimes done this), then you are getting the same energy going in as if you were fly sparging, so it couldn’t be slower.
For me the real time savings though is that I don’t need to babysit the sparge as it is happening, so I can go do something else then instead of waiting for later to do it.

Batch sparging would probably save you about 1/2 an hour with no appreciable effect on your efficiency.

Denny, with your method how long do you let your sparge water sit in the tun before vorlauf and draining again? Currently I only do 170 degree water for sparge and let it sit for 15 minutes.

I don’t let it sit at all. After a lot of experimenting, I found no value to it and it just extended the brew day. Conversion is done at that point so there’s nothing to be gained. I simply stir in 190F water, vorlauf a qt. or so, and run off.

yup. Heard Denny and a few other talking about this a while back on another thread. I have run with no real wait after the second water addition (sparge for lack of a better term) unless I need to do something. I have let it sit 30 min while I ate lunch just for my conveinience. No diference I can tell in the product form no wait to 30 min. I add at somehwere in the low 190s as well.

Barry

I am another brewer who fly sparged for a long time and then eventually started batch sparging. I did not experience any change in beer quality or significant drop in efficiency. It’s just a simpler process which requires significantly less attention and saves me 30-40 minutes every time I brew. I made good beer fly sparging too, and if you enjoy the process, go for it.

Excellent thank you.

batch

I have tried both. On my large batches I fly, but most of the time I batch. It saves about 30 min or so. I have to admit though, I use a copper manifold. :oops:

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com