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Fast lager method question?

Hello I am brewing a lager that’s 1.060og an FG 1.015 so I am going to use the fast lager method which saids to ramp up the temp once you reach 50% of OG so I guessing I start the ramp up at 1.037 I thinking that would be at 50%?

If you don’t raise the temp at exactly 1.037…it won’t work.

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When I use the quick lager method, it’s normally on a Czech Pils with an
OG of 1.047 and I ferment at 50 degrees F for 5 days and then let go to ale temps to finish… 5 days might be a little too long given the lower OG (compared to 1.060+ OG beers) but it helps me sleep at night :wink:

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I didn’t know there was a fast lager method but I’ve been doing something similar to what @iahomebrew says for a few years now so I guess that makes me a fast lager-er?? I don’t take a SG reading until a few weeks out.

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I don’t bother with a gravity reading. I give it 4-5 days, then increase the temp.

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Similar to others, I start my lagers in the upper 40’s/low 50’s. Then after 4-5 days, I raise the temp to low 60’s. Might even go as high as upper 60’s after a couple more days. Then I let it cool down naturally and let her sit until I’m ready to rack to a carboy for lagering. Maybe 2 weeks, maybe longer depending on how busy I am with life in general. And I usually don’t check the SG until I rack it. Might lager 3 weeks, might go 4 months depending on style and how long it takes me to accumulate enough bottles.

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Why rush a lager. The low and slow is the way to go. Lager yeast is not forgiving and the flaws from tring to rush one can not be covered up. Alittle patient’s goes along way when brewing a lager. By rising the temperature before near final gravity will create esters that are spicy fruity in your lager . Also you can create fusel alcohols, sulfur flavors diacytl and butterscotch flavors by trying to rush one. In my opinion it just not worth trying to rush it. It a lager you want it clean and flawless. You may create a drinkable beer rushing it but if your going to take the time to make a lager why not try to make a great beer thats flawless and drinkable.

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Do any of you lager in a chest freezer? Mine has been unoccupied for the summer months and I was wondering if a bucket with the airlock would fit into there. I have only done ales for the passed 2 years.

Depends on big the chest freezer is. I used to use a 7cf chest freezer to make lagers all the time. Used to be able to fit 2 carboys with airlock in it.

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I have to disagree Damian, I think lagers can be femented in much the same manner as ales. Allowing the temperature to rise near the end of fermentation can be benefial like the D rest for ales. It’s not about rushing it for me. I seldom keg sooner than 3-4 weeks anyway.

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so what were your experiences trying a fast lager fermentation? I’d love to hear why it didn’t work for you.

I am going to try this for my first lager

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Danny boy i agree a D rest is needed near the end of fermentation but doing one to early is not beneficial like i said about off flavors and etc… You want your lager yeast to finish clean doing a diacytl rest is needed toward the end of fermentation. In my opinion posting and showing some one that you fermenting four to five days with out taking a gravity reading and raising the temp is a poor response to a post due to you not explaining why and how you can do it. That would be awful advise to give some one whos just beginning to make lagers. Now Denny you know your brewing practices and system and how your yeast acts with all your years of experience you have brewing that you probably dont need to take a gravity reading due to you knowing your pitch rate and your experience. Not that its not possible to finish a lager to near diacytl rest gravity in four or five days but i think it might be a point to point out pitching rates for lagers that us more experience brewers are able to do a fast lager without off flavors. So we are not miss leading the newer and up and coming brewers to create a terrible beer… The low and slow method and doing a diacytl rest near the end of fermentation is your best guarantee to creating a great lager untill the brewer gets more comfortable and better understanding of pitch rates and other varibles that will help them make a great lager. I use the slow and low method and do my diacytl rest 2 to 5 point near my expected final gravity with out any off flavors and have clean great lagers every time. Like i said why rush a lager.

Who said the fast lager method dont work for me. I just dont see the point in trying to rush one due to as i stated above. By doing the low and slow method i dont have to worry about creating off flavors and flaws by being impatient and rushing it along.

Oh boy! the stage is set! D versus D!
The big shooters that mass produce stuff, and have clients all over this world, spending a copious amount, have all to show the world, a fast lager can and does sell.
Also, look at how some of those imported German brews, which stand alone with their unique flavors…
I won’t bet on one camp to have the answer. There a just too many different palates out there and that in turn has too many different opinions…
This would be a great discussion on experimental brewing… I have alot of respect for both you gentleman. Have a healthy talk! Sneezles61

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It’s all opinion…mine was solicited so i gave it. My process works for me. My advice is find one that works for you.

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I’m sorry, I have to disagree with some of your points. First, no matter what fermentation schedule I’m using, I find a d rest unnecessary 90% of the time. Also, I think the fast lager ferment is perfect for new lager brewers or those who want to have a life outside of homebrewing. And I see a difference between rushing a lager and spending unnecessary time on it.

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I apologize if I misunderstood you. I thought you didn’t care for the method because it didn’t work for you. My thought is that if it works as well as an extended fermentation, why not do it?

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I don’t have so much time doing lagers, per se’ … I have lagered ales… I would like to “try” the low O2 method this winter… The legitimate piece of the puzzle as I see it is, how do you enjoy your brews and process…
Think of it like this… You can have a totally automated home brew scenario… OR, perhaps you have a very basic, hands on, totally controlling, aspect brewery… I would believe, each would produce very different brews, yet, undeniably beautiful brew… The care comes from the brewer… PERIOD… :relaxed: Sneezles61

[quote=“denny, post:17, topic:26605”]
I find a d rest unnecessary 90% of the time.
[/quote] With the fast method i understand where it would be unnecessary. Due to the 4 or 5 days of of lager temps then the rise in temperature. Which would take care of any diacytl. Now when your doing the low and slow method Denny are you saying that 10% of time that it is unnecessary there.

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