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Caribou Slobber H2O

Hello Everyone,

I have a water chemistry question:

This weekend I’m planning on brewing an AG version of NB’s Caribou Slobber. Like many, it was my first extract beer kit from NB, and we liked it so well last year that I want to revisit it now that I’ve moved over to AG brewing.

The grain bill includes:

9-lbs.-Rahr-2-row-pale
.75-lbs.-Briess-Caramel-60L
.5-lbs.-Briess-Caramel-80L
.25-lbs.-Fawcett-Pale-Chocolate
.125-lbs.-English-Black-Malt

For my water, I’ve been starting with 100% RO water and adjusting as follows:

[i]Baseline: Add 1 tsp of calcium chloride to each 5 gallons of water treated. Add 2% sauermalz to the grist.

Deviate from the baseline as follows:

For soft water beers (i.e Pils, Helles). Use half the baseline amount of calcium chloride and increase the sauermalz to 3%

For beers that use roast malt (Stout, porter): Skip the sauermalz.

For British beers: Add 1 tsp gypsum as well as 1 tsp calcium chloride

For very minerally beers (Export, Burton ale): Double the calcium chloride and the gypsum.[/i]

My question is, if I adhere to the above guidelines for adjusting my water, should I eliminate the saurmaltz? I’m still unclear on what qualifies as roast malt.

I think that the Caribou slobber is reasonably close to a British brown ale, so I would use the water treatments (1 tsp gypsum, 1 tsp calcium chloride) as you would for the British beers. Roast malts are the dark malts (chocolate, carafa, black patent, roasted barley). Definitely no sauermalz needed for this beer.

J

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