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Carbonating through liquid line

Does anyone carb by pushing the gas through the liquid line? Any tips on doing this or not doing this?

I have never done it, but know others who have. It works for them.

Don’t try to force your gas QD on, you have to use the liquid QD.

Might be good to release pressure from the keg before connecting the gas line, as a precaution against beer getting pushed up into them.

I’ve done it, but stopped doing it because it didn’t do anything special. I think the bubbles are too big and just pass through the beer on their way up. Maybe if you had an air stone attached to the end of the dip tub it would help? Even if there is a benefit to doing this, you can accomplish the same thing by keeping the gas on the gas line, and laying the keg on it’s side enough to submerge the gas tube. This helps force carbonation too, in that it’s easy to roll the keg back and forth. Just make sure to keep the regulator pressure above keg pressure so you don’t get beer in the gas line.

I’ve been debating something like this:

http://morebeer.com/products/carbonating-keg-lid.html

… but the price has kept me away.

It’s cheaper to hook an air stone on a piece of 3/16 tubing then to the gas post leave it hang about an inch off the bottom of the keg.
Then turn the psi up to 30 lbs and release the pressure a few times leave it on at that pressure for about 30 min then release it again and turn it down to serving pressure and have a drink.
Works best it the beer is cold.

One thing I’m learning is the old adage “patience is a virtue” is sure true when it comes to brewing. I’m not force carbing any more, I simply connect up at 10 PSI and wait a few days. I force carbed my oatmeal stout and it was way over carbed and tasted a bit bland. Now after over a week it’s almost at the right carbonation level and tastes awesome. So I drank (wasted) about 1/3 to 1/2 the keg (of bland beer) and if I had waited and let it age more I would now have a full keg of really awesome stout.

nope why? You can carb quickly with just using the normal side

This is because the CO2 needs to not only disolve in the beer but also hydrate.

[quote=“Loopie Beer”]
… but also hydrate.[/quote]

What? Can you explain more?

This is because the CO2 needs to not only disolve in the beer but also hydrate.[/quote]

I have never noticed any difference than carbing a beer with setting it at a specific psi for a week vs putting it at 25-30 psi for a day or two then backing down to serving pressure.

Certain beers may benefit from the longer chilling/psuedo lagering time but the carbing method has made no difference

[quote=“Silentknyght”][quote=“Loopie Beer”]
… but also hydrate.[/quote]

What? Can you explain more?[/quote]

Yeah, plus one to the ‘what’?

I’m in the camp of not noticing a difference in MOUTHFEEL by blast/quick-force carbing. Letting the beer condition and meld flavors at cold temperatures when it happens to be hooked up to CO2 and carbonating is another matter.

I’m no chemist, far from it. But CO2 is a gas and is soluble in liquid (hence using it to force carb). The longer it sits in solution the more hydrated it becomes producing finer, tiny bubbles. As you know CO2 is dissolved quicker at COLDER temps. Ironically this hydration is supported by warmer temps. This isoften why beer that has been carbed by real force (shaking) produces a beer with bigger bubbles and little head/retention. This is why CO2 can affect mouthfeel as well. In addition, the carbonic bite you get from over carbed beers is caused by the CO2 rehydrating and becoming H2CO3.

The Wikipedia article goes into some detail on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonic_acid

Supposedly that hint of sourness you get from carbonation is a result of the carbonic acid, not the dissolved CO2.

That is very interesting.

I was just taliking to someone today about mouth feel from properly conditioned beer, as opposed to a keg that just has mass amounts of gass push though it quickly.

My opinion was that the finer bubbles from the beer conditioned gradually made for a better mouth feel and creamier head. Now I have support for that.

Thanks guys.

[quote=“Brew Meister Smith”]That is very interesting.

I was just taliking to someone today about mouth feel from properly conditioned beer, as opposed to a keg that just has mass amounts of gass push though it quickly.

My opinion was that the finer bubbles from the beer conditioned gradually made for a better mouth feel and creamier head. Now I have support for that.

Thanks guys.[/quote]
Those beers with the large bubbles are just not ready and absorbed. They will turn into small bubbles

[quote=“grainbelt”][quote=“Brew Meister Smith”]That is very interesting.

I was just taliking to someone today about mouth feel from properly conditioned beer, as opposed to a keg that just has mass amounts of gass push though it quickly.

My opinion was that the finer bubbles from the beer conditioned gradually made for a better mouth feel and creamier head. Now I have support for that.

Thanks guys.[/quote]
Those beers with the large bubbles are just not ready and absorbed. They will turn into small bubbles[/quote]
Exactly. That’s the hydration part.

[quote=“grainbelt”]
Those beers with the large bubbles are just not ready and absorbed. They will turn into small bubbles[/quote]

I’m not necessarily disputing that this is happening, but I don’t understand the mechanics/science behind it. Any resources I can read-up on?

[quote=“Silentknyght”][quote=“grainbelt”]
Those beers with the large bubbles are just not ready and absorbed. They will turn into small bubbles[/quote]

I’m not necessarily disputing that this is happening, but I don’t understand the mechanics/science behind it. Any resources I can read-up on?[/quote]

the co2 is simply not absorb into solution…colder temp absorb more c02

[quote=“Silentknyght”]I’ve been debating something like this:

http://morebeer.com/products/carbonating-keg-lid.html

… but the price has kept me away.[/quote]

I like it, 'cept for the price…Might have to check with some of my brew club members, and see what kind of parts they have laying around, and give it some D I Y action.

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