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All-Grain Brewing with John Palmer (VIDEO!)

”How to Brew” author John Palmer stops by Northern Brewer to brew an all-grain batch of a very special recipe. In our video, Palmer discusses his techniques for adding salts to brew water, mashing, batch sparging (versus fly sparging), chilling and fermentation. It’s a full-blown brew day with one of homebrewing’s most influential people. Grab a pint and enjoy the show.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/connect/2 ... hn-palmer/

Thanks for the great video. Everyone should watch this, I look forward to more !

Great video helps a tun. I just got most of my stuff and will be doing an my first all-grain Brew this Sat/Sun. What temp was the sparge water, I read somewhere to put boiling water in as a mash out to collect the second runnings, Also I will be doing 5 gallons I know the strike water is set to a ration of water to grain around 1.33qts/lb. Yet he mentioned it should be half of what you plan to boil.

Any help will be great.

[quote=“Jon462”]Also I will be doing 5 gallons I know the strike water is set to a ration of water to grain around 1.33qts/lb. Yet he mentioned it should be half of what you plan to boil.[/quote]The ratio of water to grain in the mash is not set at a certain amount - if you want equal runnings in order to maximize efficiency, you sparge with half the desired kettle volume, then divide your total grain weight by eight to determine the volume of wort (in gallons) that the grain will hold back and add this amount to the volume for the sparge and this is the volume of water to use in the mash.

For example, if you’re mashing 12 lbs of grain and want 6.5 gallons in the kettle, your sparge is 6.5/2 = 3.25 gallons and your mash is 12/8 + 3.25 = 4.75 gallons (a 1.6 qt/lb ratio), total water is 8.0 gallons.

Shadetree, so 8 is a figure calculated by loss of liquid to the grain? If so, why 8? My math sucks!

Each pound of grain absorbs about 0.125 gallons which is 1/8. Multiplying grain weight by 1/8 is the same as dividing grain weight by eight.

Or just use Denny’s tried and trued method of 2 quarts per pound for mash and calculate from there. I have liked that lately, with good success on efficiencies.

Thank you for the information gents.

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