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Yeast Starters/Dry Yeast

Hey all. I read an article the other day that said you don’t need to do a yeast starter with dry yeast. Just simply rehydrate and add to the wort. Has this been your experience too and are there any benefits/problems with doing a starter with dry yeast?

Thanks

I’ve heard that it’s actually more stressful to dry yeast if you make a starter with it. Doesn’t need a starter. That is one of the huge benefits of dry yeast, not to mention that it’s relatively cheap and very high quality these days in the 21st century and there is a very good variety for lots of different beer styles.

I don’t even rehydrate, I just sprinkle it onto the wort directly. A lot of people will say “hey you’re killing 50% of your yeast cells on contact” to which my response is, I don’t care, the results speak for themselves.

[quote=“dmtaylo2”]I’ve heard that it’s actually more stressful to dry yeast if you make a starter with it. Doesn’t need a starter. That is one of the huge benefits of dry yeast, not to mention that it’s relatively cheap and very high quality these days in the 21st century and there is a very good variety for lots of different beer styles.

I don’t even rehydrate, I just sprinkle it onto the wort directly. A lot of people will say “hey you’re killing 50% of your yeast cells on contact” to which my response is, I don’t care, the results speak for themselves.[/quote]

You can pitch without rehydrating if your gravity is on the lower end and its an ale. If you are at all pushing toward the lower end of the recommended cell count for the beer you are making, you should rehydrate, based on some results I recently had.

Here is some good information I found from one of the manufacturers:

http://www.danstaryeast.com/about/frequently-asked-questions

Good stuff. Thank you.

My simple ROT for pitching dry yeast directly to five gallons of wort is one packet up to 1.060, 1.5 packets up to 1.090, two packets for >1.090. I do oxygenate the wort prior to pitching though so YMMV if you’re not.

[quote=“dmtaylo2”]I’ve heard that it’s actually more stressful to dry yeast if you make a starter with it. Doesn’t need a starter. That is one of the huge benefits of dry yeast, not to mention that it’s relatively cheap and very high quality these days in the 21st century and there is a very good variety for lots of different beer styles.

I don’t even rehydrate, I just sprinkle it onto the wort directly. A lot of people will say “hey you’re killing 50% of your yeast cells on contact” to which my response is, I don’t care, the results speak for themselves.[/quote]

You are killing it off, is there any bad effects? Depends on a lot of factors

Oh and results speak for themselves…homebrewers need to stop using that. No one has access to your beer, and you (not syaing you do) could have a bad pallete. Meet many of people that could not detect simple off flavors.

I would PM you with a photo of all my medals, grainbelt, but it’s not worth anyone’s time to try to earn your respect.

Good…anyone knows a medal does not mean awesome beer, there are to many factors that come into play

So right you are.

:cheers:

yeah…my beers are so awesome my results speak for themselves :roll:

[quote=“grainbelt”]Good…anyone knows a medal does not mean awesome beer, there are to many factors that come into play[/quote]A medal may not equal awesome beer but it generally indicates better-than-everything-else beer since it’s dependent on the competition.

Large comps hold some value. Small comps average beers can take medals home any day of the week.
There may only be a few beers in a combined category in small comps damn near guaranteed to take home a medal with average scores.
Then you always have the luck of the draw on judges for all comps.

I prefer to rehydrate, but have had success with pitching on my foamy wort after aeration for my beers that are relatively low gravity. Moderately high gravity 1.055-1.070) and I always rehydrate…YMMV, of course. Frankly, making starters with liquid yeast is so easy and sure fire, that I usually go that route, except when repitching fresh slurries. I keep the dry yeast on hand for spur of the moment brewing.

Large comps hold some value. Small comps average beers can take medals home any day of the week.
There may only be a few beers in a combined category in small comps damn near guaranteed to take home a medal with average scores.
Then you always have the luck of the draw on judges for all comps.[/quote]
I’m pretty sure you’re just repeating what I said only with more words…

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