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Why does my lager taste thin and watery..will it change?

This is my first lager…When i took a hydro sample to determine when to D rest i drank the sample and it tasted good but very thin and watery…is this normal for lagers to be thin/watery before carbonation…If not is there a way to bulk up this beer before serving

Carbonation changes the perception notcieably. It will give a creamy texture and a little acid bite that balances the sweetness of a lager malt. I wouldn’t worry too much.

“Lager” is a pretty big category. What type of lager? What were the ingredients?

Its a BIAB Boston lager
mashed @153*F 60 mins

9lbs 2 row
1 lb caramel 60
2oz tettnang 60 mins
1oz hallertau 15 mins
1oz hallertau DH

wy2124 bo lager yeast

OG was 1050

I started the D rest a little too late @ 1010 which i think is the FG but i did not taste diacetyl

Hope so…it has great flavor just thin…im sure it will be a nice beer just not perfect…i will rdwhahb…thanks

At 1.050/1.010 and 10% crystal I’m surprised you thought it was thin. Guess it did go pretty dry. I’m sure it will be good beer, you really want a dry crisp character to an American lager.

You think adding maltodextrin at kegging will boost the malt profile and bulk it up a bit?

You think adding maltodextrin at kegging will boost the malt profile and bulk it up a bit?[/quote]

It definitely won’t add to the malt profile.

You think adding maltodextrin at kegging will boost the malt profile and bulk it up a bit?[/quote]

It definitely won’t add to the malt profile.[/quote]

I quess i will just accept the beer for what it is and brew another…thanks

Thinking back to my first lager (okfest), I seem to remember thinking it was ‘thin’ at my hydro sample tasting.

By and large (though not without exception), I think most lagers do have a lighter mouthfeel than ales by default, as you are using very simple ingredients, dropping out a lot of polyphenols/tannins from the lagering process, and in general just going for a more quaffable, understated flavor profile. So in tasting one without carb when you are used to tasting ale hydro samples, it probably would taste ‘thin’ or even lifeless.

I wouldn’t mess with this one (especially before its carbed). Do a blind triangle tasting with Sam Adams and see if you can tell if one’s lighter in mouthfeel (though unless you’re process and recipe are completely on the money, and they might be, you will be able to tell which one is the homebrewed beer, regardless of body!). As you say, if you REALLY don’t like the finished product, brew it again and tweak.

Carbonation, especially with lagers, is really critical to the taste/drinking experience of them.

[quote=“Pietro”]Thinking back to my first lager (okfest), I seem to remember thinking it was ‘thin’ at my hydro sample tasting.

By and large (though not without exception), I think most lagers do have a lighter mouthfeel than ales by default, as you are using very simple ingredients, dropping out a lot of polyphenols/tannins from the lagering process, and in general just going for a more quaffable, understated flavor profile. So in tasting one without carb when you are used to tasting ale hydro samples, it probably would taste ‘thin’ or even lifeless.

I wouldn’t mess with this one (especially before its carbed). Do a blind triangle tasting with Sam Adams and see if you can tell if one’s lighter in mouthfeel (though unless you’re process and recipe are completely on the money, and they might be, you will be able to tell which one is the homebrewed beer, regardless of body!). As you say, if you REALLY don’t like the finished product, brew it again and tweak.

Carbonation, especially with lagers, is really critical to the taste/drinking experience of them.[/quote]

Thanks alot…yes exactly what you said… it was very thin and lifeless… even the smell was very faint…but the taste is great… light but great…once carbed i will give it the final verdict and see what needs to be tweaked…either way it will be a tasty easy drinking beer…cheers

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