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Using brown sugar to raise ABV in pumpkin ale

How much brown sugar should I use in the boil to raise the alcohol by 1%?

Masheriff

Approximately 12 oz.

How much will adding that brown surger impact the flavor?

I am here to learn the answer that
question.

Never used brown sugar. I don’t think it will impart much flavor.

Use some blackstrap molasses for flavor.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]Never used brown sugar. I don’t think it will impart much flavor.

Use some blackstrap molasses for flavor.[/quote]

Second.

I am trying to recall, but I did a version of NB’s Extract for Pumpkin Ale and I am pretty sure it added brown sugar. Not 100 sure if it was in the recipe or if I added as a modification. But the result was a very popular beer. I will check my notes for when I brew an AG pumpkin ale in the next few weeks

It won’t add any flavor since it will ferment out completely. It will add color.

I don’t know if I’d go so far as to say it wouldn’t add ANY flavor, but I do agree that any difference between brown sugar and regular sugar will be subtle. Brown sugar is typically regular sugar with a very small percentage of molasses added.

So yeah, I’m with the guys saying to try straight up molasses if you want a more distinct flavor. Or if you truly just want to raise ABV, with minimal flavor impact, use table sugar.

Sorry, it won’t add any sweet caramelized sugar flavor… and I assume that’s what the OP was looking for. It WILL add alcohol which will dry the beer out some and may thin it out as well. So I’ll rephrase… it will add ALMOST no flavor since it will ferment out. Nothing noticeable at least. :roll:

Based on my experience, none at all. It adds no flavor.

Based on my experience, none at all. It adds no flavor.[/quote]

I’ve added honey to my primary about a day or two into fermentation to up the ABV and to get the most out of my honey flavor and aroma and was wondering if you did the same with brown sugar could you get any flavor out of it? Just a thought.

Honey has a lot of volatiles in it that contribute to its flavor, which is why you see people recommending things like using unpasteurized honey and adding after initial fermentation is under way.

I don’t THINK brown sugar has the same issues.

BTW, since i think dobe12 may have though I was arguing with him judging by the eye roll smiley, I’m not really. I’m just a stickler for detail, and very little difference isn’t the same as none at all. Take Randy Mosher (author of the book Radical Brewing) for example: he claims to be able to tell a flavor difference in finished beer between various varieties of refined sugars. I don’t doubt that someone with a refined enough palette truly can taste a subtle difference, but that doesn’t mean a regular guy like me is gonna notice anything.

edit: accidentally wrote “fished” beer instead of “finished” beer. I don’t think even Randy would propose adding fish. :slight_smile:

Based on my experience, none at all. It adds no flavor.[/quote]

I’ve added honey to my primary about a day or two into fermentation to up the ABV and to get the most out of my honey flavor and aroma and was wondering if you did the same with brown sugar could you get any flavor out of it? Just a thought.[/quote]

I doubt it. I’ve used it to prime and no on in a blind tasting could detect it.

[quote=“Nate42”]Honey has a lot of volatiles in it that contribute to its flavor, which is why you see people recommending things like using unpasteurized honey and adding after initial fermentation is under way.

I don’t THINK brown sugar has the same issues.

BTW, since i think dobe12 may have though I was arguing with him judging by the eye roll smiley, I’m not really. I’m just a stickler for detail, and very little difference isn’t the same as none at all. Take Randy Mosher (author of the book Radical Brewing) for example: he claims to be able to tell a flavor difference in fished beer between various varieties of refined sugars. I don’t doubt that someone with a refined enough palette truly can taste a subtle difference, but that doesn’t mean a regular guy like me is gonna notice anything.[/quote]

:roll:

I didn’t think you were arguing. Just being a stickler for detail as you said. And I stand by what I said. When I’ve added brown sugar to a beer during the boil, I did not notice a brown sugar flavor. It ferments out leaving little to nothing behind but alcohol. It will change the color which is why I would only choose to use it over cane sugar if I was looking to alter the color. But if I was looking to add a sweetness to a beer, I wouldn’t try to get it from brown sugar. An earlier post asked how much it will impact flavor. I’m just trying to answer the question from my personal experiences.

[quote=“dobe12”][quote=“Nate42”]Honey has a lot of volatiles in it that contribute to its flavor, which is why you see people recommending things like using unpasteurized honey and adding after initial fermentation is under way.

I don’t THINK brown sugar has the same issues.

BTW, since i think dobe12 may have though I was arguing with him judging by the eye roll smiley, I’m not really. I’m just a stickler for detail, and very little difference isn’t the same as none at all. Take Randy Mosher (author of the book Radical Brewing) for example: he claims to be able to tell a flavor difference in fished beer between various varieties of refined sugars. I don’t doubt that someone with a refined enough palette truly can taste a subtle difference, but that doesn’t mean a regular guy like me is gonna notice anything.[/quote]

:roll:

I didn’t think you were arguing. Just being a stickler for detail as you said. And I stand by what I said. When I’ve added brown sugar to a beer during the boil, I did not notice a brown sugar flavor. It ferments out leaving little to nothing behind but alcohol. It will change the color which is why I would only choose to use it over cane sugar if I was looking to alter the color. But if I was looking to add a sweetness to a beer, I wouldn’t try to get it from brown sugar. An earlier post asked how much it will impact flavor. I’m just trying to answer the question from my personal experiences.[/quote]

Agreed completely based on my own experience as well, whatever subtle differences there may be, I can’t taste them. I’ve never done a scientific blind test or anything, but I have thrown various types of sugar into various recipes just for the hell of it, and the type of sugar never seemed to matter. And I definitely agree that adding any type of sugar isn’t going to add sweetness.

Ok try this one on for size,

UI read a recipe that boiled a gallon of water with brown sugar, cooled to temp of carboy, and added it after 7 days. Will this boost ABV w/o flavor? have you ever heard of this? and finnaly Does anyone reccommend it?

[quote=“Nate42”]

And I definitely agree that adding any type of sugar isn’t going to add sweetness.[/quote]lactose. BLAM! that just happened! :lol:

[quote=“Jon462”]Ok try this one on for size,

UI read a recipe that boiled a gallon of water with brown sugar, cooled to temp of carboy, and added it after 7 days. Will this boost ABV w/o flavor? have you ever heard of this? and finnaly Does anyone reccommend it?[/quote]I’ve done it. Use as little water as possible. I am a firm believer that the yeast should not get dessert until it has eaten all of its dinner. If your brown sugar has ANY chance of imparting flavor, this is the way it will do it.

[quote=“Edward Teach”][quote=“Nate42”]

And I definitely agree that adding any type of sugar isn’t going to add sweetness.[/quote]lactose. BLAM! that just happened! :lol: [/quote]

You have defeated me brave sir. But we shall meet again! :slight_smile:

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