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Tubing size

I am thinking about kegging again. does the inside diameter of the tubing make a difference? I had difficulties in the past, that is why a have been bottling.

Beer lines are available in 3/16" and 1/4" inside diameters. The larger one offers less resistance but either can be balanced properly with a little effort.

What kind of difficulties did you have before?

As @dannyboy58 said either can be balanced. Easy way is to start with 10’ of 3/16” line and dial it in.

I had anissue with too mush head , even though the pressure was done. I like to use priming sugar for the co2.

does length matter and way?

I don’t know what you mean by “pressure was done” but yes line length matters and if you primed with sugar it’s possible you could have overcarbed your beer to start with.

Temperature, pressure, line diameter and length all play a role and have to be balanced. If your lines are too short you’ll get too much foam. That’s why @loopie_beer says start wtih 10 feet. If the pour is too slow trim it a little shorter until you get the speed of pour you want with the amount of head you want.

There are lots of articles around on balancing your system that go into great detail about how to determine line length, like this one, Determining the Right Pressure for Your Draft Beer System [Chart]

In the end if you put on 10 feet as described above you’ll be able to fine tune it.

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Here is a line length calculator I found handy as a starting point. As others suggested above, start long and trim as desired.

Maybe 2’ lines in my keezer, no problems… Sneezles61

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What ID do you use?

How much priming sugar have you used per gallon of beer? I don’t natural carbonate in kegs but have read that one-half the amount is used that would be used for carbonating in the bottle.

edit: Should have added that length of line and pressure do make a big difference.

small diameter… Was it 5/16"? Sneezles61

It has been a long time sense I kegged. I think I used 5/8 cup as directions on the kits. I did not wanted to have to force co2 gas in the beer to create the headaches. I wanted to try co2 naturally.

pressure in the keg sugar eating yeast.

I think it was 3/16

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