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Trying to do what hasn't been done

I’m always trying to think of things no one has done, but almost always after a goggle search I realize dammit its always been done. My most recent idea a dark colored hoppy Wheat beer with American yeast was just put to shit after realizing there is an entire list of dark American wheat beers on beer advocate. Has any beer not been brewed?? I’ll keep trying but it seems at times that no brew has been un brewed.

Have you ever tried frost brewing or triple hops brewing?..oh wait.

I suggest focusing on brewing beer that you want to drink and don’t worry about whether someone else has already done it before.

you could try the fish head beer like they did here

http://www.collegehumor.com/article/692 ... -local-bar

Considering how long people have been brewing, I doubt theres an original combination that hasn’t been tried. But that shouldn’t stop you from creating something and calling it your own.

I have been thinking of an IPA made with all bine dried hops. :lol:

But yes, +1 to this:

Beechwood aging? Cold filtering?

Of coarse. Creating a style of beer is not my focus its just sometimes like this I briefly think I’ve come up with something original that will be good. I had plans to do a basic American wheat, but then I thought hmm what about a dark American wheat or a dark American wheat with kicked up hop flavor… like a black IPA crossed with a wheat beer :idea:

Hey I still got my cat hair pale ale…

Waaaaa?? You mean like adding hops 3 different times. Mind blown. Maybe I could also frost brew it??

I think making a beer that tastes good without hops is worth experimenting with. I had a good gruit beer in MI last year. I think that there are a lot of variables to work with and making tasty gruit beer would be quite an accomplishment in my book.

100% roasted barley beer.
A beer made with scrambled eggs, fiberglass and hot sauce.
An orange, mushroom and garlic saison that is fermented inside of the baseball glove of Ernie Banks and then inoculated with brett and conditioned inside of a snake.

Come on, there are lots of original ideas out there. You’re just not trying hard enough. :slight_smile:

On a serious note, I often think about how many different types of grains we have access to, all of the hops, yeast strains and then the mixture and percentages that you might use. Then you have the water composition, the mashing techniques and fermentation schedules. It occurs to me that everytime I make a beer, it’s probably a unique fingerprint because of all the variables. I admit that when you have that glass of beer in your hand it may just resemble a pale ale or pilsner like any other but there are A LOT of variables out there.

There’s a great section in Tasting Beer about the beer buzzwords, and which actually mean anything. Stroh’s being “fire brewed” actually does mean something: flame heating element as opposed to an electric/steam-fired kettle. But yes, ‘triple hopped’ is the equivalent of Don Draper telling Lucky Strike to market their cigarettes as “toasted”: Meaningless except in the eyes of uneducated consumers who just want to be told what to do.

To the OP, see the South Park episode called “The Simpsons Already Did It”. Whether or not something has already been done does not directly impact its coolness…because as was said, just about everything has already been done…its how well you do it. I have a brewing friend who is hell bent on being really really really off-centered. Gruit brewed in the dark while listening to black metal that has a drop or two of human blood in it? Done. Yes, he’s literally done that. To me, the whole thing is exhausting. I’m personally in a stage in my brewing life where I want to focus on brewing the best beer possible, not the weirdest beer possible. As Mr. Miyagi said, “first learn stand, then learn fly”.

To me, the cool thing about homebrewing is being able to create a unique beverage based on one’s own flavor preferences that you can’t buy, can’t buy cheaply, can’t buy somewhere close to you, or a combination of the three. A triple hopped, imperial peanut butter pumpkin baltic porter aged on Bolivian wormwood, while it sounds cool to say, usually ends up being a disappointment. That being said, if you personally love the flavor of ginger, and the flavor of porter…and think they would go well together…brew that $#!+. :cheers:

I have made this beer! It tasted like jelly beans:)

I do agree with the others who have stated that they want to make good, solid beer, time after time. I have always followed that direction. I want to be able to have a long line of beers in the pipeline, 4 beers on tap at all times with cold & carbed kegs as a backup and I want to be excited for each one of those beers to come to the taps. But many of my beers are pretty pedestrian when compared to other homebrewers… blonde ales, English Pale Ales, Red Lager, Oktoberfest, Helles, Pilsner, Amber Ales, etc. Being able to make very good beer consistently is the goal. I was talking with another brewer about the Water book and in one section it mentions that pH test strips are for amateurs. If you want to make great beer all the time, get a pH meter. I mentioned that and he said, “we ARE amateurs!” and I agreed with that but said, “Yes, but I want professional results”. 8)

[quote=“chad041”][quote=“Ken Lenard”]
An orange, mushroom and garlic saison that is fermented inside of the baseball glove of Ernie Banks and then inoculated with brett and conditioned inside of a snake.

[/quote]
I have made this beer! It tasted like jelly beans:)[/quote]
Hmm. You’ve been very fortunate in the jelly beans you’ve tasted. :lol:

I guess just trust your palette for beer and you should be fine :slight_smile: Some successful local brewers started out that way

I seriously laughed out loud when reading this.

What about bottling and then labeling with stickers that tell you when your beer is cold and ready to drink? Maybe something with mountains and ice…just so you know it’s cold?

:stuck_out_tongue:

Try barrel aging ingredients rather than the beer. I just made a porter that was conditioned on coffee beans. The coffee beans were aged in a bourbon barrel
:twisted:

[quote=“S.Scoggin”]Try barrel aging ingredients rather than the beer. I just made a porter that was conditioned on coffee beans. The coffee beans were aged in a bourbon barrel
:twisted: [/quote]
Huh?

[quote=“roffenburger”][quote=“S.Scoggin”]Try barrel aging ingredients rather than the beer. I just made a porter that was conditioned on coffee beans. The coffee beans were aged in a bourbon barrel
:twisted: [/quote]
Huh?[/quote]

Light roasted coffee beans that were then put into a whiskey barrel for 1-2 weeks. Bought from a new local company. Then I conditioned my beer on the beans. I’m sure similar things have been done

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