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Trub removal

I’m usually pretty anal about keeping the bulk of the trub out of the fermenter and especially with delicate beers like lager. However, I was wondering if it is really necessary with brews like robust porters and stouts? Whirlpooling never works out for me and I always lose more wort than I care too when trying to keep trub out of the fermenter.

I boil with loose hops then chill and when transferring into the primary, the hops seem to work great with filtering out the trub

You can pour the entire contents of the boil kettle into the fermenter without detriment to the beer. I use a mesh strainer to keep the bulk of the trub from getting in because I reuse my yeast. With a steady hand while you’re siphoning (to secondary, bottling bucket, or keg) you shouldn’t worry about what goes into the fermenter from the boil kettle.

:cheers:

I used to be really anal about it but now I don’t think it matters much at all so I just dump everything. It will settle out. Just don’t be desperate to get every single ounce of beer out of the primary and you should be able to rack fine above the trub and yeast.

I think I’ll just start dumping everything in the bucket when I’m
not planning on saving the yeast. I’v heard whole hops work good for filtering out trub but wouldn’t they hold alot of wort?

It is usualy recommended to keep the hot trub out of the fermenter. The cold break is not as important.

Other than the temperature that the trub comes out, is there a physical, noticeable difference between the hot break and the cold break? Is one bigger than the other?

Here are some good articles from the old Brewing Techniques:

http://morebeer.com/brewingtechniques/l ... rchet.html http://morebeer.com/brewingtechniques/l ... rchet.html

[quote=“brans041”]Other than the temperature that the trub comes out, is there a physical, noticeable difference between the hot break and the cold break?[/quote]The hot break will sink along with the hops, and if left for a while will compact, but the cold break is more “fluffy” and takes much longer to settle out.

[quote=“mvsawyer”]You can pour the entire contents of the boil kettle into the fermenter without detriment to the beer. I use a mesh strainer to keep the bulk of the trub from getting in because I reuse my yeast. With a steady hand while you’re siphoning (to secondary, bottling bucket, or keg) you shouldn’t worry about what goes into the fermenter from the boil kettle.

:cheers: [/quote]
I use a mesh strainer as well, along with whirl pooling.

One time I took 10 gallons of delicate lager and separated it from all of the trub and pitched some yeast into it as well. When it was done I got thre 12oz beers and they didn’t taste any different then the 10 gallons of trubless wonder. Go figure. I never bothered to separate trub from that point forward.

I started doing a new process on my last two beers. After I chill the wort down I pour it into a 5 gallon bucket with a 5 gallon paint strainer from Home Depot, of course I have fully Star Saned both of them. I then pull up the strainer to get rid of as many hops as possible before putting it into the carboy.

I’m not sure if I lose any flavor or aroma by doing this, but I did get a clearer beer.

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