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Temp for nottingham

I just brewed a Irish Red with Nottingham yeast. I have made this brew with wlp002 before. I notice a bit of tart after taste with the nottingham. I fermented at 60 degress. Could this be from a low ferment temp? Has anyone had this before? Its my 1st time use this yeast.

Nope, that’s the way that yeast tastes.

That suck I really like the beer with wlp002. The they were all out, and suggested nottingham.

I’ve got a batch of ESB with Notty ready to bottle right now. I never really noticed any tartness. Guess I’ll have another taste tonight and find out.

FWIW… I have a love-hate relationship with this yeast. When it works, I love it. There were a couple of years where their quality control was not up to snuff and people had bad batches, including myself. But then I decided to give it another shot. On this last batch, I had fermentation going within 24 hours, so we’re back to love again.

I’ll look for the tartness though. Perhaps you guys just have better palates than mine.

I found out recently WLP 039 was “Notty”, but not after I made 2 heavier dark beers. I’m not finding “tart” , maybe it’s because they are heavier, or like Dave said my taster isn’t the best either.
I’ll revisit when they are older.

I used Notty pretty much exclusively for about a year. At first I thought it was very clean, but eventually started picking up the tartness. Once I noticed it, I just couldn’t use the yeast any longer.

I hate when that happens.

Notty is a serious work horse. I used it for 8 batches in a row, and kept a close eye on fermentation. I had beers ferment out within 48 hours.

I typically kept my temps at ~65, and was satasfied with it.

I know I am going into a touchy area but is it fair to say that a dry yeast and a liquid yeast of the same strain are different ? Does the dry yeast process change the yeast in ways some brewers can tell ?
For example I do get a peach flavor from US05 that I do not get with WL001 or WY 1056 but they are the same Chico strain.

Yeast mutate frequently. The “same” yeast from different sources is certainly NOT the same anymore. Similar, but each is unique.

I found that a lot of British ale yeasts kick off that flavor, but it can work really well depending on hop/malt bill. I would describe it as more ‘tangy’ that ‘tart’, but I do find it in Notty and S-04 as well. Some beers it is outright obnoxious though. I tried using S-04 in an American IPA one time, blech. With darker beers, the tang seems to balance out/get drowned out by the roast/dark malt flavor.

HOWEVER…

I believe a lot of the ‘new’ East Coast IPA’s (such as Heady Topper, Hill Farmstead) are using yeasts that behave somewhat like British ale yeasts (ie slightly lower attenuation, and some low pleasant phenols, creamier body than the standard west coast gluttons). There may be a way to manipulate temperature during fermentation to avoid it, but I haven’t found it yet…

+1 for being a workhorse. Clear down to the High 50’s. I’ve known for years that Notty’s not one of Denny’s favs, and my usage is generally with heavier dark malt beers, and as Pietro says will mask out
some of the fine flavors. I always have a packt around and use it for the odd things that can happen, it’s good to have in a pinch IMO.

[quote=“Pietro”]I found that a lot of British ale yeasts kick off that flavor, but it can work really well depending on hop/malt bill. I would describe it as more ‘tangy’ that ‘tart’, but I do find it in Notty and S-04 as well. Some beers it is outright obnoxious though. I tried using S-04 in an American IPA one time, blech. With darker beers, the tang seems to balance out/get drowned out by the roast/dark malt flavor.

HOWEVER…

I believe a lot of the ‘new’ East Coast IPA’s (such as Heady Topper, Hill Farmstead) are using yeasts that behave somewhat like British ale yeasts (ie slightly lower attenuation, and some low pleasant phenols, creamier body than the standard west coast gluttons). There may be a way to manipulate temperature during fermentation to avoid it, but I haven’t found it yet…[/quote]

I know Stone’s house yeast is supposedly similar to WLP007 (Dry English Ale) so it’s not uncommon to have west coast AIPA’s using english yeasts. I have tasted the “tangy” in Notty but I only used it in my first brew ever and I did a million things wrong. It was in an Irish Red so it was a bit more noticeable since the hop flavors were quite subdued but it was definitely there and not necessarily welcome. I do think that the slight “fruitiness” of English yeasts tend to add something desirable to an AIPA but I can’t put my finger on what exactly it is. The best AIPA I’ve made to date used WLP013 (London Ale). Late additions were Simcoe and Cascade. The slight hint of fruitiness really complimented the west coast hops imo.

[quote=“DUNNGOOD”]I know I am going into a touchy area but is it fair to say that a dry yeast and a liquid yeast of the same strain are different ? Does the dry yeast process change the yeast in ways some brewers can tell ?
For example I do get a peach flavor from US05 that I do not get with WL001 or WY 1056 but they are the same Chico strain.[/quote]

You are absolutely correct. Just because they have the same origin doesn’t necessarily mean they have the same characteristics.

Sorry to threadjack, but this is what the Vermont IPA’s do so well. Kimmich gets these amazing tropical esters to come out of the Conan yeast with Heady Topper, and same with Hill (but he gets a bigger variety of esters/phenols to enhance whatever hops he is using!)

Sorry to threadjack, but this is what the Vermont IPA’s do so well. Kimmich gets these amazing tropical esters to come out of the Conan yeast with Heady Topper, and same with Hill (but he gets a bigger variety of esters/phenols to enhance whatever hops he is using!)[/quote]

You get some very interesting tropical fruit notes with WLP013 and Mosiac hops.

Right, I think Conan and Hill’s house yeast is similar to/derivative of a highly attenuative brit ale yeast.

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