Switching kegs back and forth

So I’m just beginning to home brew and am in the process of purchasing all of my equipment. Like anything else im learning you can spend a little or a lot. Since I think I’m going to be in this long haul, I’d rather buy good stuff and just keep adding. So my first question deals with my kegerator. I have one and have been using it a year or so with commercial kegs with sankey system. If I get the converter for ball lock kegs, can I put two 5 gallon kegs in my kegerator and just switch back and forth to have 2 beers on tap without two actual taps? Ideally I would have a double tower, but figure I can add that in the upcoming months. This is just a short term solution.

Will this work? Thanks

Yes you can. I do it since one of my taps is broken. It’s a pain in the arse. And every time I switch the valves get a little beer on it which I have to wipe off so it doesn’t get all stickey and cause problems. I have two new taps I to drill some holes and mount them. Mine are pin locks but same principle.

I would certainly look at this as a short term solution. But to get a new double tower and dual regulator will be over 200, so it’s not as urgent as stocking kegs and carboys.

You don’t need a double regulator just a splitter for now. I wonder if you can split you beer out line close to the tap so you beer doesn’t mix. Short term of course.

Or a manifold for the gas with one keg on a picnic tap.

You would need to get two valves though. I agree just serve one from a picnic tap.

I’m starting to think of just brewing one beer at a time for 1-2 months and then just getting what I need. If I spread out buying equipment every couple months it shouldn’t be as bad. When I am ready to go, I will need to switch to a double tower and dual regulator right? My current sankey could be converted to ball lock and just get one ball lock for the other tap line?

Thanks again

You don’t need a double regulator unless you want to serve at different pressures or force carbonate. What I do is set the regulator for 10psi which I find a nice serving pressure and just let the other keg carbonate for two weeks at that pressure. I have a two keg system and am usually only serving one while one is carbonating. If you want two kegs on tap you will need another place to carbonate your fresh kegs. An old fridge works for that then you need another regulator . Like you said a little at a time.

So if I get a splitter now and a picnic style tap I could have two beers at once. And if I do want to upgrade I can still potentially do that with a splitter and not a double regulator? Just don’t want to buy something that I won’t need long term. I also realize it may depend on what two beers I might have on tap at the time.
Thanks again. It’s great having this forum. I’m reading through older posts and learning as much as I can.

Correct. A splitter allows you to serve 2 kegs at the same pressure. A dual gauge reg allows you to serve 2 kegs at different temps.
If it were me, I would buy a simple “t” splitter at this time and use a picnic tap until you procure a double faucet tower.

Also, if you use swivel nuts at the end of your beverage and gas lines you can easily switch between ball lock, pin lock, and commercial kegs.

[quote=“Loopie Beer”]Correct. A splitter allows you to serve 2 kegs at the same pressure. A dual gauge reg allows you to serve 2 kegs at different temps.
If it were me, I would buy a simple “t” splitter at this time and use a picnic tap until you procure a double faucet tower.

Also, if you use swivel nuts at the end of your beverage and gas lines you can easily switch between ball lock, pin lock, and commercial kegs.[/quote]

I thought most dual gauge regulators showed the tank pressure (if the tank is full or not) and the working pressure (what you are setting your serving pressure to). At least that’s what mine does. Did you mean double body regulator?

I know our host sells double body governator regulators that have two serving pressure/carbing pressure gauges and one to show tank pressure:

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/the- ... lator.html

A bit expensive, but you could use it to serve two kegs at different pressures. Or you could force carb one at a higher pressure than your serving pressure for your other.

I have a dual gauge regulator that has a y-splitter at the outlet. It will allow me to serve two kegs, but only at the same pressure. I may expand later, but as always it’s a work-in-progress :slight_smile:

Your right. I was confused. Mine has two gauges also one for tank pressure. I thought they all had two gauges. So the double body has three gauges?

Yep, the one NB sells has three. Two show working pressure and one shows tank pressure. You can dial the knobs for the working pressures to different settings, making it easy to set one for serving and one for force carbing.

Looks like a nifty option, maybe I’ll upgrade one day. I think I read somewhere that you can just detach the tank pressure one and add another body, essentially making a double body one. I’d have to see if I can find that.

Yep, the one NB sells has three. Two show working pressure and one shows tank pressure. You can dial the knobs for the working pressures to different settings, making it easy to set one for serving and one for force carbing.

Looks like a nifty option, maybe I’ll upgrade one day. I think I read somewhere that you can just detach the tank pressure one and add another body, essentially making a double body one. I’d have to see if I can find that.[/quote]

I just looked at mine. It looks like if I get another single it can be attached in line where the tank gauge is and you would have it. Actually you could add more if you wanted. Cheaper to buy it setup though.

Yes Templar, I meant double body not dual gauge. I have both. I often find most of my beers are carbed/served as approximately 10psi based on approximately 34°. This basically makes the double body reg pointless.

It would help if you were force carbing.

Ah I see. How long does it take to carb at 10 psi and 34 degrees? Just curious.

I am working on putting my kegerator together. Haven’t done anything with it yet though. I’ve read some people do the rocking method and force carb in a couple of days. Others do lower pressure at lower temps and it still done in maybe a week or two? As with most of my beer, I’m not in a rush for anything. I am excited about kegging though since I’m tired of bottling :slight_smile:

5-7 days and it will be carbed. But it takes 2 weeks for the CO2 to hydrate. This is true whether you slow carb or fast carb. I slow carb for a a few reasons:

  1. no risk of over carbing
  2. it takes 2 weeks for CO2 to hydrate anyways
  3. shaking the keg for fast carb is detrimental to proteins/head formation
  4. puts a little age on the beer

Edited because of stupid auto correct.

Thanks. I was searching the same information since many months. Thanks for your hard work. :?