Sulfur smell

Im doing a norther brown with wyeast 1028 london ale. Fermention started fast and air lock bubbled like a machine gun for the first 36 hours. The smell coming from the air lock the first 36 or so hours was the typical hoppy goodness im used to smelling. However now on day 3 airlock is not doing much and there is a bad sulfur type smell coming from the air lock ive never smelled before.

After 10 batches and thinking the first nine, which turned out to be fantastic beers, were screwed up at one point i realize the sulfer smell is probably normal and will go away. However just looking to see 1 is it normal for this yeast and 2 is there anything extra i should do to help the beer clean up.

Better out than in!

Honestly, a normal byproduct with some yeasts.

Give it plenty of time to finish up and it should fade

While far from scientific, sulfur scents usually let me know the vigorous main fermentation is over and the yeast are beginning to clean up. It lasts a couple of days.

That is odd. I’ve used 1028 a bunch of times. I’ve never encountered a sulfur smell during fermentation. Does your water have a significant sulfate content? Did you add gypsum or epsom to the water? Is your ferment temp higher than about 68F? Just curious.

More than likely, any aromas like this will fade prior to kegging. If there is a concern with the aroma, you may want to delay the transfer from the primary for a few days.

[quote=“mabrungard”]That is odd. I’ve used 1028 a bunch of times. I’ve never encountered a sulfur smell during fermentation. Does your water have a significant sulfate content? Did you add gypsum or epsom to the water? Is your ferment temp higher than about 68F? Just curious.

More than likely, any aromas like this will fade prior to kegging. If there is a concern with the aroma, you may want to delay the transfer from the primary for a few days.[/quote]

This was my time adjusting my water. On the plus side i did hit my ph number assuming color phast strips read slighly low 0.2-0.3. I started with distilled water and did add gypsum, epsom salt calcium chloride, and baking soda to get to my finished water profile which was.

Ca 48.3
Mg 5.2
Na 43.4
SO4 50.1
Cl 63.8
HCO3 115.1

Another question while i got you here. Maybe i missed it in bru’n water info but what would i do if my Ph reading came out off, How would i know how much of whatever I need to add to raise or lower Ph after ive mashed in?

It doesn’t look like the sulfate was excessive in your brewing water, so that is probably not the source. Don’t know what to tell you there.

Assuming the water inputs are accurate and all the grains are input correctly, my experience is that you are not likely to be more than 0.2 off from your target. Its more likely to be within 0.1 units. I just brewed a Boh Pils last night and the meter reading was right on my target of 5.4. I brew with RO and have to build, so the water inputs are consistent.

Your reading correction for the strips sounds correct. So, the mash pH probably did end up where you wanted it. I don’t know what to tell you about calculating acid or base additions to move the pH, but that is a good question. I suppose that you could use Bru’n Water and observe what the difference in the acid or base addition is if you adjust your target pH by a tenth or two. Or you could just add a little more acid or base in the Water Adjustment sheet and see what the pH effect is. The good thing is that the pH reading vs. acid addition is fairly linear in the normal mashing pH range.

[quote=“mabrungard”]It doesn’t look like the sulfate was excessive in your brewing water, so that is probably not the source. Don’t know what to tell you there.

Assuming the water inputs are accurate and all the grains are input correctly, my experience is that you are not likely to be more than 0.2 off from your target. Its more likely to be within 0.1 units. I just brewed a Boh Pils last night and the meter reading was right on my target of 5.4. I brew with RO and have to build, so the water inputs are consistent.

Your reading correction for the strips sounds correct. So, the mash pH probably did end up where you wanted it. I don’t know what to tell you about calculating acid or base additions to move the pH, but that is a good question. I suppose that you could use Bru’n Water and observe what the difference in the acid or base addition is if you adjust your target pH by a tenth or two. Or you could just add a little more acid or base in the Water Adjustment sheet and see what the pH effect is. The good thing is that the pH reading vs. acid addition is fairly linear in the normal mashing pH range.[/quote]

This was my first time using bru’n water and making additions. Great program easy to use, accurate , and also helped me understand the additions better than any sorce i looked at previously. Your sugestion about using bru’n water to see the effect of the addition was my thought also, i wasnt sure if its normal to have to adjust. Sounds to me like i wont have to adjust Ph as long as a weigh everything properly and input my grain correctly which works for me because the last thing i want is to be fumbling around with that once the mash has started.

I just used this yeast and got a lot of sulfur in the finished beer. I Burtonized the water, and was trying to get the burnt match aroma of the Burton snatch. This yeast is capable of making those aromas. I think it will probably go away in a few days if you are fermenting in the mid 60s.

Two weeks ago I brewed a honey weizen with Munich wheat beer yeast from Danstar and have had a sulfur smell from day one… How long could it go? I just tasted a sample and not something I wanna drink…

Fascinating thread. I was just looking for sulfur smell information and ended up here. I don’t take this “problem” very seriously at all. I was just curious about the cause. For me, it is just fun to add active yeast to apple cider and drink it. After 4 days at most the effervescence is very intense and I like the taste. After about nine days the alcohol content gets too strong for my needs. But I rarely have a gallon last that long so that is not really a problem either. In fact the sulfur smell, when it appears, has one great advantage that I did not find mentioned here at all. I find I can’t give the stuff away and as a result I always have to drink the entire batch myself. I just can’t find the drawback in that.

:shock:

Some people like to smell their farts.

Some people like to smell their farts.[/quote]
…but to drink them?!