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Smoking St. Louis style ribs

I’m will be smoking four racks of St. Louis style ribs tomorrow. I have previously smoked this style of ribs for five hours at ≈ 225°F in the smoker. I was thinking of trying the 3-2-1 method this time. Three hours in the smoker - 2 hours foil wrapped in the oven - 1 hour back in the smoker to finish.

Have you tried this method? Good quality smoked ribs or never do it again?

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I’m more a Memphis rib guy… after doing this version, I’d never want to spend hours with a long smoke again:

Yes, the constant mopping gets a little tedious, but they were tasty ribs.

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Sounds good @uberculture Gonna have to give that recipe a try!

Sounds good but I would need to get some charcoal and dig a fire pit.

I cheated a bit and just used my kettle grill set up for indirect grilling. Still tasted lovely.

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I dont do ribs, but a brisket, well thats another topic. I do use a kettle grill, indirect, such as Uberculture, and low and slow… I’ve done brisket half way through, wrap in foil, then continue, and I’ve done unwrapped and when close to done, set the grill to wide open for a nice bark… I prefer the later… With a nice IPA home brew! Sneezles61

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Brisket is off topic when the topic is smoking meat. Brisket MUST be corned and then served in a boil with cabbage, onions, small red potatoes, and carrots.

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I thought talking religion was not allowed here!!!

Cheers,

Ron

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The difference both jummy. Dry rubb or wett. I do like. Dry rubb. Damm now i want. Ribs. Or a pulled pork sandwich

I beg to differ Flars, boiled is a so so way to do a brisket :relaxed:. I didn’t mention that I use wood chip smoke also whilst the brisket starts cooking. Do you use dry or wet chips? Sneezles61

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I use dry chips or pellets when I use the gas grill for just adding some smoke flavor to chicken. Smoke time is only for an hour at about 400°F to cook the chicken. Burner on gas grill is low temperature so need smaller wood. Chunks of wood are used in the propane fired smoker. Each chunk is about 2 to 3 ounces. The chunks are dry also.

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Humor gone awry. Should be, brisket MUST be corned and then served in a boil with cabbage, onions, small red potatoes, and carrots for St. Patrick’s Day to satisfy Wifes Irish immigrant side of the family. Also rye bread.

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I’ve learned that meat will absorb smoke at a lower temp, from about 100-120*. Now, something I haven’t tried yet is to cook over oak wood. Possible to try ribs for thanksgiving, seeing as I don’t much care fer turkey… Sneezles61

You’re right about the lower temperature absorbing or holding more smoke on the meat. It is said to be best to put the meat in the smoker at refrigerator temperature rather than allowing the meat to warm to room temp.

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Apple wood, mesquite, or hickory? Sneezles61

I use hickory for ribs.

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No smoking ribs today. Emergency visit to the dentist today for my Wife. Didn’t finish prepping the ribs until 2 PM. Front porch was a sunny 61°F this afternoon. Tomorrow a high of 29° and wind gusts up to 39 MPH. I’ll be wearing my pac boots.

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Snow removal around here… 6". I love winter! Over the long Thanksgiving W/E I will do some out of doors cooking Thanks for the seed you planted Flars! Sneezles61

12" of snow here. Need to shovel the smoker out. I do three hours on smoke then wrap 2 hours, sauce and back on for about 15 minutes to set the sauce. I find the extra hour is to much and the smoke can give a bitter taste. My 2 cents

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