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Slow drip from picnic faucet

Hey, when trying to pour from the picnic faucet, I notice how it’s a bit slow (well, really slow). It kinda cuts out after a while. What does this indicate?

Thanks!

my take is that you have one of two things: not enough gas to push the beer out or some kind of blockage.

  1. try cranking up your gas, making sure that there’s a clear entry into the keg.

  2. if you have another picnic tap and liquid post out, try to dispense with that.

  3. disconnect the liquid line and twist open the picnic tap. make sure it opens and closes well.

  4. if all that fails, you might have some blockage in the post or the dip tube in your keg.

It’s probable it was too low pressure. I was carbing at 60F+ in the keg, but that got it super foamy, and un pourable.

I’ve added a chest freezer now, but till I get the Johnson, getting to a consistent temp is… tricky.

Hmm. I could leave it a few more days, let it carb up a bit and settle, but I have no patience - I’d like to get serving!

A blockage would suck, but it’s not impossible - whilst this had a couple of months in secondary, it still had trub which could have ended up in the keg ( but I did filter it, so…)

Will see if I can add enough pressure. Thanks.

[quote=“imajes”]It’s probable it was too low pressure. I was carbing at 60F+ in the keg, but that got it super foamy, and un pourable.

I’ve added a chest freezer now, but till I get the Johnson, getting to a consistent temp is… tricky.

Hmm. I could leave it a few more days, let it carb up a bit and settle, but I have no patience - I’d like to get serving!

A blockage would suck, but it’s not impossible - whilst this had a couple of months in secondary, it still had trub which could have ended up in the keg ( but I did filter it, so…)

Will see if I can add enough pressure. Thanks.[/quote]

What pressure were you carbing it at?

What temp/pressure are you serving at?

How long is your tap line?

How did you filter it?

I bet your picnic tap is not screwed together tight

that’s possible; i took it apart (incorrectly).

[quote=“Nighthawk”][quote=“imajes”]It’s probable it was too low pressure. I was carbing at 60F+ in the keg, but that got it super foamy, and un pourable.

I’ve added a chest freezer now, but till I get the Johnson, getting to a consistent temp is… tricky.

Hmm. I could leave it a few more days, let it carb up a bit and settle, but I have no patience - I’d like to get serving!

A blockage would suck, but it’s not impossible - whilst this had a couple of months in secondary, it still had trub which could have ended up in the keg ( but I did filter it, so…)

Will see if I can add enough pressure. Thanks.[/quote]

What pressure were you carbing it at?

What temp/pressure are you serving at?

How long is your tap line?

How did you filter it?[/quote]

Carbed at 20psi for 2 days at 60F.

tried serving at 5psi, 30-40F.

the tap line is the length from NB’s keg kit…

and-

i filtered with a settled carboy very carefully auto siphoned. it’s not the best filtered, but i don’t think it had any particles, since there was so much trub left.

[quote]Carbed at 20psi for 2 days at 60F.

tried serving at 5psi, 30-40F.

the tap line is the length from NB’s keg kit…[/quote]
You’d need more like 2 weeks to carb the beer at 60F/20 psi, so first off what you are dispensing is basically flat. Quick carbing works by setting a pressure much higher than is needed for your desired carbonation level. How long did you let it cool down before trying to pour? It can take a good 24 hours.

Now that it is cold, try 30 psi for a couple of days. Remember to purge the head space of the keg before attempting to pour. At 40F you should have the regulator set to 11 or 12 psi to keep the correct carb (regular ale/lager). If the beer pours too fast at this pressure and foams a lot, you need a longer dispensing line. I think the NB kit ships with 5’? You’ll need more like 7-8’ to get a good pour at 12 psi. Better to err on the side of too long than too short, since you can’t make a short line longer.

thanks!

Good, I thought you might have tried to filter it with a coffee filter and a funnel.

As nyaket said, it takes more the 2 days to carbonate a keg. Unless you have a diffusion stone in it.

You can also leave it at your serving pressure and rock the keg 2-3 times a day. This will force CO2 into solution faster. As long as you don’t have the pressure higher than the serving pressure you will not over carbonate it.

If the beer is coming out to fast, you can also add some epoxy mixing twisters to the line.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/PC-PRO ... _vc=HPPVZ3

[quote=“Nighthawk”]Good, I thought you might have tried to filter it with a coffee filter and a funnel.

As nyaket said, it takes more the 2 days to carbonate a keg. Unless you have a diffusion stone in it.

You can also leave it at your serving pressure and rock the keg 2-3 times a day. This will force CO2 into solution faster. As long as you don’t have the pressure higher than the serving pressure you will not over carbonate it.

If the beer is coming out to fast, you can also add some epoxy mixing twisters to the line.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/PC-PRO ... _vc=HPPVZ3[/quote]

Hah. I had considered the filter, and then I realized both how stupid it is, and how likely it is that I’d over oxidize the beer and kill it. :frowning:

I’m chalking this one down to over exuberance: trying to get the beer out too quickly!

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