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Simplest Way to Brew a Basic Light Beer

I would like to experiment with something that would first need the foundation of a low-calorie beer. I am definitely a beginner brewer with only three batches under my belt. Can anyone give me advice on how to brew a very basic low-calorie beer? I would like to experiment with different fruit flavors and would first like a nice mellow foundation. Any help would be great! Thank you.

found this on another site. The original allgrain version of this is well respected.

Centennial Blonde Extract
Brew Type: Extract
Date: 10/4/2008
Style: Blonde Ale
Brewer: CStone
Batch Size: 5.00 gal
Assistant Brewer:
Boil Volume: 3.50 gal
Boil Time: 60 min
Equipment: Brew Pot (4 Gallon)
Taste Rating (50 possible points): 35.0

Ingredients Amount Item Type % or IBU
3.00 lb Extra Light Dry Extract (3.0 SRM) Dry Extract 54.55 %
2.00 lb Extra Light Dry Extract (3.0 SRM) Dry Extract 36.36 %
0.50 lb Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) Grain 9.09 %
0.25 oz Centennial [7.70 %] (45 min) Hops 5.4 IBU
0.25 oz Centennial [7.70 %] (20 min) Hops 3.6 IBU
0.25 oz Cascade [6.00 %] (10 min) Hops 1.7 IBU
0.25 oz Cascade [6.00 %] (5 min) Hops 0.9 IBU

Beer Profile Estimated Original Gravity: 1.044 SG (1.038-1.054 SG)
Measured Original Gravity: 1.042 SG
Estimated Final Gravity: 1.012 SG (1.008-1.013 SG)
Measured Final Gravity: 1.010 SG
Estimated Color: 3.3 SRM (3.0-6.0 SRM)
Color [Color]
Bitterness: 16.1 IBU (15.0-28.0 IBU)
Alpha Acid Units: 3.9 AAU
Estimated Alcohol by Volume: 4.25 % (3.80-5.50 %)
Actual Alcohol by Volume: 4.16 %
Actual Calories: 184 cal/pint

My BeerSmith calculates 202.13 kcal/pint (151.6 kcal/12 oz) for the above recipe not 184/pint (138/12oz)

That recipe sounds great and I do appreciate the response, but I really need a way to produce a low-calorie beer - For example, how do the big beer companies create light beer? Many people prefer that style over a full bodied beer (unfortunately). That is who I am trying to target with this experiment I am doing. 100-120 cals per 12 oz lets say…

Light beer has more water and less ingredients. Plus they use quite a bit of adjuncts that equate to sugar that ferments out completely leaving only alcohol. You don’t want a lot of residual sugar left since that is where much of the calories are in beer (alcohol does provide some calories as well).

I’d suggest a 3lb bag of extra light DME and a pound of table sugar. For a 5gal batch that’ll be a 1.033 OG beer that finishes pretty dry. Or use wheat DME in the same recipe, wheat beers are very neutral and people add fruit flavorings a lot. My wife uses sugar-free DaVinci syrups to flavor wheat beer or cream ale. She does this by the glass so she can vary the fruit flavor.

Not only are they using adjuncts, but they also use enzymes in their process to really drive down unfermentable carbohydrates.

Quite honestly, the big brewers make light beer by making a normal strength beer and then watering it down. Perhaps that is all you need to do. Make a beer with an alcohol level of 4-5%, then add distilled water to bring it down to your 120 calories or whatever. Just being honest.

The thought has crossed my mind that this is a set-up troll post.

Fantastic! Thank you very much. I will definitely adhere to those tips.

Interesting…yeah, I can see the big companies doing that. Not the worst idea for experimenting with my fruit flavor beers. Thanks!

[quote=“tom sawyer”]
I’d suggest a 3lb bag of extra light DME and a pound of table sugar. For a 5gal batch that’ll be a 1.033 OG beer that finishes pretty dry. Or use wheat DME in the same recipe, wheat beers are very neutral and people add fruit flavorings a lot. My wife uses sugar-free DaVinci syrups to flavor wheat beer or cream ale. She does this by the glass so she can vary the fruit flavor.[/quote]

^ I think this strategy will be your best bet.

as mentioned above, a lot of the super low calorie beers use enzymes. which is not very practical for the homebrewer.

hope it works out :cheers:

I actually brew a lot of “low calorie” beers…no secret really, I just mash about 6-8 pounds of grain for a 5 gallon batch.

As a spanking new brewer you could find a kit that you like and only use three quarters of the fermentables.

Very good! Thanks for all your help guys. :slight_smile: [quote=“S.Scoggin”][quote=“tom sawyer”]
I’d suggest a 3lb bag of extra light DME and a pound of table sugar. For a 5gal batch that’ll be a 1.033 OG beer that finishes pretty dry. Or use wheat DME in the same recipe, wheat beers are very neutral and people add fruit flavorings a lot. My wife uses sugar-free DaVinci syrups to flavor wheat beer or cream ale. She does this by the glass so she can vary the fruit flavor.[/quote]

^ I think this strategy will be your best bet.

as mentioned above, a lot of the super low calorie beers use enzymes. which is not very practical for the homebrewer.

hope it works out :cheers: [/quote][quote=“darthmorgoth”]I actually brew a lot of “low calorie” beers…no secret really, I just mash about 6-8 pounds of grain for a 5 gallon batch.

As a spanking new brewer you could find a kit that you like and only use three quarters of the fermentables.[/quote]

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