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Secondary Fermentation Question

I just brewed my first batch of beer, American wheat, which is in primary fermentation as of last night. I have the deluxe starter kit which has a secondary fermentation step but the directions that came with the recipe only lists one fermentation step. I’m confused whether I should/need to do secondary fermentation with this type of beer. What are the benefits of secondary fermentation and is it necessary in my current situation???

Most beers don’t really NEED secondary conditioning (it’s not fermentation if you’re not adding any sugar). Your wheat is a 4 week beer so 2 week primary, 2 week bottle, ENJOY!

I answer “Yes” to “Should I secondary?” for the following reasons:

  1. I want to save my yeast and the recipe calls for a dryhop. I don’t want hop residue in my yeast.
  2. I need to free up carboy space for another brew.
  3. I’m going to age a beer longer than a few months and want to do so with the beer off of the yeast.
  4. I’m adding fruit or some other fermentables and would like a brand new fermentation. In this case I will be sure to bring quite a bit of the yeast along with the transfer.

Is your secondary a smaller vessel than the primary? If so, you may be using #2 quite a bit.

[quote=“mvsawyer”]Most beers don’t really NEED secondary conditioning (it’s not fermentation if you’re not adding any sugar). Your wheat is a 4 week beer so 2 week primary, 2 week bottle, ENJOY!

I answer “Yes” to “Should I secondary?” for the following reasons:

  1. I want to save my yeast and the recipe calls for a dryhop. I don’t want hop residue in my yeast.
  2. I need to free up carboy space for another brew.
  3. I’m going to age a beer longer than a few months and want to do so with the beer off of the yeast.
  4. I’m adding fruit or some other fermentables and would like a brand new fermentation. In this case I will be sure to bring quite a bit of the yeast along with the transfer.

Is your secondary a smaller vessel than the primary? If so, you may be using #2 quite a bit.[/quote]
Darn nice reply.
Condition your bottles at around 70° to 75°. Cooler temps will work, but conditioning time will increase.

When you bottle, fill 1 or 2 soda bottles. Any size. Squeeze the O2 out and screw the cap on. As the bottles carbonate, they will expand. No wondering what is happening in the glass bottles.

Allow them to sit for 3 weeks minimum at room temp. 2 days in the fridge. Then enjoy.

If you can plan ahead, soda bottles are very useful when you go camping, to the lake, or to friends place for Sunday football. No worries about broken glass.

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