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Raise fermentation temp?

Hello I have a ? about raise fermentation temp near the end of fermentation. For both ale’s an lager’s. Now for ales can a person just pitch the right amount of yeast an just hold it at fermentation temp for like 3 to 4 weeks. An do the same for lager’s. If someone was to raise the fermentation temp for ale’s would a person wait for likle 4 to 5 days an then raise the temp.

Why would you want to raise it? Ales can be left at the temperature range the yeast manufacturer recommends for fermentation. Lagers are different in that you might need to raise the temperature at the end of the fermentation to avoid any off flavors from diacetyl (butter taste). Ales never have this problem and can be left alone, but Lagers very occasionally might need a bump up in temperature toward the end of fermentation. For lagers, raising the temperature 10 degrees above the recommended fermentation temperatures for 4 or 5 days after fermentation is almost complete will eliminate any off flavors. After that, drop the temperature back down to nearly freezing (34 degrees Fahrenheit) for the lagering period which to me is usually two months.

Again, with Ales, you don’t have to worry about this at all, and most lagers don’t require the temperature raise either. I always do the temperature raise with a lager only as a safety factor to avoid any problems, but generally if you let a lager ferment for a month, no temperature raise is necessary. But I do it anyway.

I disagree. Raising the temp after a couple days on an ale is a good thing. It will help attenuation.

I personally pitch low, most all yeast at 60f. Then let it climb to 62f for a day, then to 64f. Towards day four or five up a couple more. After about a week I will let it hit 68f.

Agree with Muddywater. I started doing this on saisons, but now pretty have a ramp-up fermentation schedule every style, to ensure attenuation.

From what I have gathered (and experienced), REALLY keeping the temp in check (low) is only critical in ales in the first few days, during the ‘Active’ phase of fermentation. Lagers probably more like 10-14 days. After that, you can let the yeast warm up (or warm them up) and let them finish doing their work, unless you really need some residual sweetness in the beer, but I prefer to raise mash temp if I need that.

As the others said, there are plenty of good reasons to raise temp toward the end of fermentation, even with an ale. In fact, its an essential part of the flavor profile of some beers like belgians and saisons.

That said, if you pitch plenty of yeast, you don’t NEED to raise the temp, so if you’re a newby it shouldn’t necessarily be that high on your concerns list. Especially since newbies tend to ferment too hot to begin with, and often neglect to account for the natural temp rise that comes from a vigorous fermentation.

If we refer back to the BYO test of under/correct/over pitching yeast, it was inconclusive if pitching rates make a difference in attenuation.

Also it was inconclusive if it made a difference in flavors.

Raising temps? Like secondaries, if it make you feel good go ahead and do it.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]If we refer back to the BYO test of under/correct/over pitching yeast, it was inconclusive if pitching rates make a difference in attenuation.

Also it was inconclusive if it made a difference in flavors.

Raising temps? Like secondaries, if it make you feel good go ahead and do it.[/quote]

Link?

I can’t believe it didn’t make a difference with acetaldehyde/fusel/etc. production.

I think it depends on the type of ale yeast. The Fullers strain will quit working if you keep the Fermentation the same when it starts to wind down. This strain will just drop out and seem stuck. You then have to bump up the temp and rouse the yeast to hit your final gravity. Or you can let the temp rise at the near end of fermentation so the yeast can meet the final gravity.
Low to mid 60’s for fermentation. High 60’s to low 70’s for the finish.

[quote=“Pietro”][quote=“Nighthawk”]If we refer back to the BYO test of under/correct/over pitching yeast, it was inconclusive if pitching rates make a difference in attenuation.

Also it was inconclusive if it made a difference in flavors.

Raising temps? Like secondaries, if it make you feel good go ahead and do it.[/quote]

Link?

I can’t believe it didn’t make a difference with acetaldehyde/fusel/etc. production.[/quote]

Linky poo.

:wink:

[quote=“wallybeer”]I think it depends on the type of ale yeast.

[/quote]

I’ll agree with this. The BYO test was with US-05.

I most likely stand corrected on my original comment to the post. I normally use Safale 05 when brewing ales, and have had no attenuation problems with this strain of yeast. Living in Florida, during Summer, I actually have to put my ales into my temperature controlled lagering setup to keep the temps around the 68 degree range, even in my air conditioned house. This strain of yeast is quite happy right there, and finishes it’s job perfectly.

I should have asked which strain of yeast as some of you wisely did. I am big on lagers and am quite familiar with jockeying temperatures up and down for them. Perhaps I was remiss in not questioning ale yeasts. As usual, you guys always step up to the plate and help us all out… My apologies for the oversight!

:cheers:

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