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Over-carbed solution?

I just finished my 4 tap keezer and I love it, but a few of my beers are pretty foamy. I figured I over carbed them, so I dropped all the pressure from the kegs to let them equalize. Will this work to relieve some of the carbonation? I was planning on trying them as they go and putting the co2 back to them when they equalize. Is there a better way to do this that I might have overlooked?

That’ll work but it’ll be slow. I usually just disconnect an over carbed keg from C02 and pull the pressure relief valve regularly until the carb gets down to the desired level. Doesn’t happen terribly fast as cold beer tends to hang on to carbonation quite well.

That is about all you can do.

Pour a glass to see how it is. If over carbed, release the pressure and allow the CO2 to out gas. It may take several hours to equalize. Pour another and check.

Or, just leave it off the gas. Pour beers until it looks right. Then put the gas back on.

There is a better way that only takes a couple of seconds to scrub the Co2 out of solution. Take one of your gas lines and put a liquid disconnect on it then put that on the liquid side of the keg for about 10 seconds This will remove a large amount of the co2 and you will be drinking your beer in less then a minute. I keep one hooked up to my gas lines at all time just for this. Try it you will be amazed.

First, are you sure it’s over-carbonation? Maybe your lines are too short.

IME, the fastest way to lower carbonation would be to unhook the gas, warm the kegs back to room temp, and release the pressure periodically. As the beer warms up, it’ll want to release more of the absorbed CO2.

Not sure I understand? Without pressure relief, how are you supposed to relieve the pressure if it’s hooked up to the gas, liquid or gas side?

Are you suggesting opening up the keg and forcing CO2 through the solution? I can see this possibly working since the agitation could force more gas out of the beer.

Yes you hook a liquid disconnect to your gas line hook that to the dip tube side of the keg you have to burp the pressure relief valve to let the pressure out. I have done this lots of times and will shoot a video of it the next time I do it. You will be drinking beer thats not over carbed in minutes instead of hours. If you had a pin lock keg instead of ball lock then you would just use a extra gas connect on the gas side to let pressure out. I wanted to add dont put a gas disconnect on the liquid side or you will have a B*H of a time getting it off

First, are you sure it’s over-carbonation? Maybe your lines are too short.

IME, the fastest way to lower carbonation would be to unhook the gas, warm the kegs back to room temp, and release the pressure periodically. As the beer warms up, it’ll want to release more of the absorbed CO2.

Not sure I understand? Without pressure relief, how are you supposed to relieve the pressure if it’s hooked up to the gas, liquid or gas side?

Are you suggesting opening up the keg and forcing CO2 through the solution? I can see this possibly working since the agitation could force more gas out of the beer.[/quote]

I’ll give this a try next time I have an over carbonated beer. Minutes is way better than days to be drinking perfectly carbonated beer.

:cheers:

So blowing that co2 through the dip tube aggitates the beer to release its co2? Have you ever aggitated it too much and make it flat? I assume it messes your clarity up pretty good if you just cold condition?

Yes it scrubs the Co2 out of solution. I just do a 10-15 second burst then make sure the pressure is released then re-pressurize to your serving pressure and give it a pour. If its still over carbed do it again for another short burst. I have never really noticed that the clarity was screwed up but then again most of the time when I over pressurize a keg its in the force carb stage.

I see what you mean. That layer of yeast at the bottom would get kicked up and would need to resettle to get the clarity back.

I tried this last night and it worked pretty good. I’m still getting some foam, but the carbonation is better. I’m going to check it tonight after it settles for a bit more. What length of line am I suppose to have? I have all my taps on 5ft lines currently.

I have 7’ of 3/16 line with a serving pressure of 10psi 40degrees.

Line lengths depends on temperature and pressure. More than likely 5 ft isn’t long enough and your pours are going to be foamy. My setup is 40*F and 10ft line at 10 psi. You can calculate line length or start with 10ft and cut it down if it’s too slow of a pour.

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=108080&hilit=+foam

So, I might be ok with just lowering my chest temp? I think I would rather try that first. I’m ok with a bit colder beer. If that doesn’t work, I will try longer lines.

What serving pressure are you using? The lower the temp the more Co2 your beer will take into solution. So you will have to turn your pressure down try 8 or 9 with a temp around 40F

http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php

This table will show you the correlation between temp and pressure on the carbonation level of the beer.

Yes. At 33 degrees you can get away with 5-6 psi and 3 feet of line. It’s too cold for most styles but beer warms pretty quick if you pour into an unchilled glass.

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