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No hops?

So, just out of curiosity. Has anyone ever brewed a beer with absolutely no hops??? I don’t know why the idea popped into my head. But it did and now the curiosity is killing me.

Im sure it would be a fairly sweet beer, but still a beer none-the-less right?

Any one ever done this? Or heard of one???

Cheers!

I had a no hopped beer at a beer festival two years ago. It was a no-hop marzen

It was very unusual, sweet-ish, but almost tart (oxymoron i know). hard to describe, and it has been a while. personally, i didn’t care for it much

Ya, I can’t imagine it would be the best-tasting beer (especially) since Im half way to a hop-head. But I wonder then, if there’s a way to make one that would be decent tasting without hops?

Without hops, it’s not beer! It’s beer-like, beer-sorta, beer-maybe, but not beer.

FWIW, white chocolate is not chocolate either. :wink:

:cheers:

You could look into brewing a gruit. Essentially beer where the hops were replaced by other bittering agents like yarrow, heather, sweet gale, & mugwort.

First of all hops are added to prevent beer from spoiling. I suppose you could brew and drink beer with no hops but I’d keep it cool or drink it quickly.

Beer is all about balance, and balance suggests at least two flavors that are somewhat complementary. Hop bitterness seems to be a good counterpoint to sweet malt or fruity esters. If you can find another pair, like the bready character and spicy/banana esters of a hefeweizen, then you don’t need much hops. Likewise, a sour beer counters the sweet malt flavors.

I’ve also found that when hops are really low you start tasting some flavors from yeast that aren’t all that tasty. So to some extent the bitterness sends your tastebuds in a particular direction rather than letting them find subtle flaws.

[quote=“tom sawyer”]First of all hops are added to prevent beer from spoiling. I suppose you could brew and drink beer with no hops but I’d keep it cool or drink it quickly.

Beer is all about balance, and balance suggests at least two flavors that are somewhat complementary. Hop bitterness seems to be a good counterpoint to sweet malt or fruity esters. If you can find another pair, like the bready character and spicy/banana esters of a hefeweizen, then you don’t need much hops. Likewise, a sour beer counters the sweet malt flavors.

I’ve also found that when hops are really low you start tasting some flavors from yeast that aren’t all that tasty. So to some extent the bitterness sends your tastebuds in a particular direction rather than letting them find subtle flaws.[/quote]

thanks. I suppose the yeast flavors would certainly take way more if a front seat.
All things I’m aware of, a balanced beer is a good beer. Recipe building 101. I’m just kinda curious as to what it would take to give a beer a “decent” amount if flavor, however un-balanced that flavor might be.

Keep in mind, I have no plans to brew one. But I am a curious soul. And after all, isn’t one of the perks of homebrewing the ability to experiment?

Make a starter and drink that - it might give you an indication of what no hop beer might taste like.

:cheers:

+1 ^^^ just might try that

[quote=“ynotbrusum”]Make a starter and drink that - it might give you an indication of what no hop beer might taste like.

:cheers: [/quote]

done that too. IMO not very tasty…

[quote=“HellBound”]So, just out of curiosity. Has anyone ever brewed a beer with absolutely no hops??? I don’t know why the idea popped into my head. But it did and now the curiosity is killing me.

Im sure it would be a fairly sweet beer, but still a beer none-the-less right?

Any one ever done this? Or heard of one???

Cheers![/quote]

Anything to replace the hops? Spices? Herbs? Fruit?
Some styles are pretty low on hops and you might not miss them.

Randy Mosher’s book Extreme Brewing has lots of examples of beers made with stuff other than hops. Great book by the way.

[quote=“S.Scoggin”][quote=“ynotbrusum”]Make a starter and drink that - it might give you an indication of what no hop beer might taste like.

:cheers: [/quote]

done that too. IMO not very tasty…[/quote]

1+ Exactly!

I was just at a Cubs-Brewers game at Miller Park over the weekend with a bunch of homebrewers from the Chicago and Milwaukee area. Tailgate started at 9am so it was kegs and eggs! :o Anyway, I started talking with a very good brewer who has kind of turned into the mad scientist of brewers in our group. He told me that he made a 100% Brett beer with pilsner malt, wheat, etc., and when I asked him about the hops, he said, “no hops”. No hops? … “No hops”. He said that the Brett brought the wort from 1.070 to 1.000 in 2 days. 1.000 would suggest that the beer will be very dry and possibly offset the sweetness. I can’t really imagine what it would taste like but I’m going to guess it’s not my style.

There was a show called Beer Nutz which you might be able to find on Hulu now. The hosts went to California (I think) and one brewery made beers with crazy ingredients like squash and beets. One beer had no hops at all and some other weird ingredient. The brewer said, “It’s really smoooooth” and the host took a sip, made a face and said, “Sorry but I don’t really care for it”. :expressionless:

At the risk of showing my rookie-ness. What’s Brett?

BRETT

. A funky yeast.

Also, it wasn’t California but Portland where Beer Nutz went to visit the Hair Of The Dog brewery. The brewer looks like a complete nut to me, no pun intended. It was also one of the hosts who called the pilsner-and-squash beer smoooooth. The link is below. Around the 12:00 minute mark they go there and sample his beers including one with no hops.

http://www.hulu.com/watch/16039/beer-nu ... s-p1-so-i0

This sentence from that Wiki article sum it up like no other passage I’ve read… In most beer styles Brettanomyces is viewed as a contaminant and the characteristics it imparts are considered unwelcome “off-flavours.” However, in some styles, particularly certain traditional Belgian ales, it is appreciated and encouraged

'Nuff said. Stay away from Brett and Belgian styles. :wink:

Cool video. Hair of the dog is a great brewery IMO. Portland is most definitely full of nuts. We’re lucky to get nuts of the beer variety also
:lol:

At the risk of showing my rookie-ness. What’s Brett?[/quote]

Hey, only I get to have rookie-ness. :wink:

[quote=“S.Scoggin”]Cool video. Hair of the dog is a great brewery IMO. Portland is most definitely full of nuts. We’re lucky to get nuts of the beer variety also
:lol: [/quote]
My opinion is that the show’s concept was very good but it was generally put together wrong. For starters, the hosts of the show appeared to have no beer knowledge at all. In almost every episode when they saw a mash in progress, they looked at it, pointed and asked, “What’s that??!!” as if they had never seen it. But they did have some good shows in San Francisco where they interviewed Fritz Maytag, in Burlington, VT where they sat with Greg Noonan and in Milwaukee where they took the Milwaukee River Beer Tour. Good idea, I think but bad execution.

Is that Hair Of The Dog brewery still around? Pretty wild beers, for sure.

[quote=“Ken Lenard”][quote=“S.Scoggin”]Cool video. Hair of the dog is a great brewery IMO. Portland is most definitely full of nuts. We’re lucky to get nuts of the beer variety also
:lol: [/quote]
My opinion is that the show’s concept was very good but it was generally put together wrong. For starters, the hosts of the show appeared to have no beer knowledge at all. In almost every episode when they saw a mash in progress, they looked at it, pointed and asked, “What’s that??!!” as if they had never seen it. But they did have some good shows in San Francisco where they interviewed Fritz Maytag, in Burlington, VT where they sat with Greg Noonan and in Milwaukee where they took the Milwaukee River Beer Tour. Good idea, I think but bad execution.

Is that Hair Of The Dog brewery still around? Pretty wild beers, for sure.[/quote]
Yes, it recently moved to a bigger location.

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