Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Need a Bönnsch Recipe

This is a long shot, but I recently returned from a trip to Bonn, Germany, where I revisited one of my favorite breweries, Brauhaus Bönnsch. I’m not sure if anybody is familiar with Bönnsch, as it’s really only available at that particular brewery, but I’d love to recreate a batch of it for back home.

Here are some descriptions and reviews of the beer, (negative comments/reviews disregarded): http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/bonnsch-trub/51181/

Sites like RateBeer and BeerAdvocate classify this as a Kolsch style, which I think is entirely inaccurate (and may attribute to some of the less than favorable reviews) as this is a beer that truly is in it’s own category. I’d love to know if anybody has heard of or tried Bönnsch, and more importantly, how can I make it?

Ach Du Lieber! Talk about reviews all over the board!! Haven’t tried this yet but now I’m curious…unfortunately no Germany travel plans currently.

I’m actually quite surprised and shocked by the low scores given to this beer. While the flavor/aroma/appearance descriptions given by everybody are pretty accurate (except for those stating that it had a musty, off-putting flavor and aroma, (I’m guessing due to dirty lines)), everybody that I know who have had this beer absolutely love it. Hence my desire to recreate it here at home!

Unfortunately, I don’t know how to categorize it, because, as I mentioned, I think that to classify it as a Kolsch is misleading at best. I’m thinking they may have used a Kolsch yeast, which is where I would start in concocting a recipe, but that’s about all I have so far.

For what it’s worth, here’s a bit more of a description, plus picture to give a better idea of the appearance/SRM.

http://havebeer.blogspot.com/2009/01/br ... -bonn.html

I also saw a German Wikipedia entry state that it was like an unfiltered Kolsch, but slightly more hoppy. That being said, I’ve yet to deviate from a recipe on any of my brews, so any guidance or suggestions would be appreciated.

I have a feeling this is going to call for some small batch brewing and lots of trial and error!

My wife is from the area, so I’ve got quite a few of those little curvy glasses.

Since Bonn is so close to Koln, many surrounding cities brew a 100% true to style Kolsch, but just can’t give it that name due to the Kolsch Konvention laws.

We also had many meals in the nearby town of Troisdorf and there’s is called Troilsch.

Those that are unfiltered in this area are called “Weiss.” Not to be confused with the totally different bayerische weizen.

Another funny thing about Bonn is that since it used to be the Capitol before it moved to Berlin, Berlin also now has many restaurants that serve Koln branded Kolsch.

never heard of it.

[quote=“brewingdan”]My wife is from the area, so I’ve got quite a few of those little curvy glasses.

Since Bonn is so close to Koln, many surrounding cities brew a 100% true to style Kolsch, but just can’t give it that name due to the Kolsch Konvention laws.

We also had many meals in the nearby town of Troisdorf and there’s is called Troilsch.

Those that are unfiltered in this area are called “Weiss.” Not to be confused with the totally different bayerische weizen.

Another funny thing about Bonn is that since it used to be the Capitol before it moved to Berlin, Berlin also now has many restaurants that serve Koln branded Kolsch.[/quote]

Thanks for the reply! I know that Bonn just missed out on the allowable distance to be allowed to brew “Kolsch” (law stipulates it must be within 20 km of city center, they’re 25 km out). My thoughts as of right now are to do a small batch of NB’s 100% Kolsch recipe, but I’m stuck on what to do to get the characteristic straw yellow, hazy appearance. Perhaps a touch of white or torrified wheat? I’m a bit concerned that it would add too much body, but I think that would help to achieve the desired SRM. Any thoughts?

Use a kolsch strain and serve it young. That strain is a SLOW and LOW floccer. It will be cloudy early.

Use a kolsch strain and serve it young. That strain is a SLOW and LOW floccer. It will be cloudy early.[/quote]
That is my thought as well. I wonder if the difference you see between this style and Kolsch is just the difference between it being served unfiltered vs. filtered.
I don’t filter my beers and rarely use any kind of fining other than Irish Moss, but for Kolsch I make an exception and use gelatin. If I don’t, it stays hazy exactly like what you are describing.

Well, I did a one-gallon test-batch yesterday, so I’ll keep you posted on the results! Thanks again for the replies!

Gah, people on Ratebeer are ridiculous. Talk about the most misleading site for rating classic beers. Everyone on those sites are into double IPAs, imperial stouts, and sours. Bunk, the lot of 'em.

This beer does say it’s a Kolsch/Altbier…those are not the same thing. Wish I could get a hold of this beer…
I hate the idea of using gelatin, but it sure does clear a beer up fast and I really like that.

[quote=“Beersk”]Gah, people on Ratebeer are ridiculous. Talk about the most misleading site for rating classic beers. Everyone on those sites are into double IPAs, imperial stouts, and sours. Bunk, the lot of 'em.

This beer does say it’s a Kolsch/Altbier…those are not the same thing. Wish I could get a hold of this beer…
I hate the idea of using gelatin, but it sure does clear a beer up fast and I really like that.[/quote]

+1 to everything you just said. I really don’t even rely on sites like that for reviews because they are all so heavily biased on the hyped up styles that you mentioned. Rather I just try to find accurate style descriptions, but in this case I’m not too convinced that the description is accurate.

Hello! I know it’s been three years, but how did this beer turn out? I, too, recently returned from Bonn, enjoyed the Bonnsch immensely, and was searching for a recipe to make at home when I found this thread. Any tips or recipes you can point me to would be appreciated.

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com