Mold question

So I got lazy after my last brew and left my brew pot, siphon, mix-stir and tubing sit around. Finally got around to cleaning it tonight and there was mold in the bottom of the pot. I threw out all the plastic stuff but I am curious if my brew pot is ok. I scrubbed the heck out of it with some Dawn and rinsed it really well…is it ok?

Yes, no problem. Afterall you cleaned it out, and will be boiling in it. If you have any doubts, boil some water in it before you do your next batch.

Hopefully you remember next time, but brewing gear is best cleaned immediately after use. I find a short soak in hot Oxyclean solution and hot water rinse makes this a snap.

PBW in hot water and or Oxyclean here also…Cleaning up after a brew day takes a looooong time for me. I’m always curious about the folks who get everything done(presumably cleaned up and everthing put away) in"3 or 4 hours". My brewing day is like a work shift. :?

I am one of 3 to 4 hour guys. I do not enjoy brewing: it’s work. No cigars or beer drinking for me. The key is to do 2 things at once. IE- heat strike water while measuring and milling grain. Cleanup is basically during boiling. Get the tun/hoses/everything you can clean and put away. Some guys mash and hour, I mash 30m, get runnings into a fired kettle ASAP and have a boil going inside an hour…

I’m one of “those guys” too. I try to multitask as much as possible while brewing, and although I do enjoy the process, there are other things I enjoy as well, so I don’t dawdle too much while I’m brewing. I do have a brew or two though, and I usually do a 60 minute mash (often along with a 90 minute boil if I’m using pilsner malts) and I can generally do the entire job from grain crush to pitching wort (including all but the final cleanup of my boiling kettle and associated utensils) in about four hours, sometimes a bit less. In fact, I did a Belgian dubbel Sunday, and it took exactly four hours from grain crush to yeast pitch. All that was left at that point was to clean my mash tun, my boil kettle, chiller and hoses, and my stirring spoon. Everything else was cleaned and put away during the boil, and I usually pitch the spent grains to my chickens and clean the tun during the boil, except it was dark by the time the boil started, so the grains stayed in the tun until the next morning.

Damn! :cry:

I’m one of “those guys” too. I try to multitask as much as possible while brewing, and although I do enjoy the process, there are other things I enjoy as well, so I don’t dawdle too much while I’m brewing. I do have a brew or two though, and I usually do a 60 minute mash (often along with a 90 minute boil if I’m using pilsner malts) and I can generally do the entire job from grain crush to pitching wort (including all but the final cleanup of my boiling kettle and associated utensils) in about four hours, sometimes a bit less. In fact, I did a Belgian dubbel Sunday, and it took exactly four hours from grain crush to yeast pitch. All that was left at that point was to clean my mash tun, my boil kettle, chiller and hoses, and my stirring spoon. Everything else was cleaned and put away during the boil, and I usually pitch the spent grains to my chickens and clean the tun during the boil, except it was dark by the time the boil started, so the grains stayed in the tun until the next morning.[/quote]
Add me to the “those guys” list too. A brew session generally takes me 7-8 hours, but I’ll do two brews during that time. Brew #2 starts mashing when brew #1 is boiling. Took a while to get the flow right, but I’m generally working flat out for most of that time. Brew kettle, chiller and hoses are the only items left to clean after I’ve got both worts in the fermenters, and if I decide to do an oxyclean soak, that isn’t included in the 7-8 calc.

Damn! :cry: [/quote]
Zwiller me too. Ever tried to brew great beer when people are over and you’re drinking? I said “tried” because you haven’t if you are doing it that way. :wink:

Damn! :cry: [/quote]
Zwiller me too. Ever tried to brew great beer when people are over and you’re drinking? I said “tried” because you haven’t if you are doing it that way. :wink: [/quote]

It is for this reason alone that I have not yet, (and may never), invest in a traditional all-grain system. All of my AG brews have been BIAB, and I’ve had pretty good results. I don’t know if I could get better results with a traditional set up, but the thought of cleaning all that equipment makes me cringe. My typical brew day lasts 5 - 6 hours, with plenty of cigar/beer time worked in! :cheers: