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Missed FG - Baltic Porter

Hi, all,

Looking for your sage advice here.
I made the NB extract kit for the Baltic Porter. Hit the OG more or less - OG 1.068.
Used WY2112

fermented at around 62ºF for 2 weeks primary.
Racked and left in secondary for 1.5mo.

Today I bottled for bottle conditioning and took a reading of 1.028. Too high. This puts my ABV at around 5.7%ish – too low ABV for the style.

It’s certainly beer. But I missed the style – would have like to have gotten to FG somewhere around 1.01, but not sure what else to have done.

I bottled a bit early as I was a bit nervous about a white film expanding on the top of the beer in the secondary. They are in big 32oz bottles and intend to leave them for some weeks/months before drinking.

My question is:
What could/should I have done to get to that FG?
I know the next Q might be: did you do a starter?
A: I can’t remember! :shock: probably. It was 2 mo ago.

Let me know your high-gravity suggestions. I owe so much of my learning to you all.

Thanks in advance.

And maybe I just answered my own question…

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=18062

It’s fine and within style?

Fairly big beer. I would have left it in the primary for at least four weeks. I don’t secondary anymore except for dry hopping, but I do not rack to the secondary until FG has been reached.

The posters in the link you found seemed also a bit impatient and took the beer out of the primary early.

More time in the primary may have shaved some points from the FG you brew reached.
Keep detailed notes for your brew days. They do come in handy in the future.
Wish you the best for future brews.

[quote=“masquelle”]Hi, all,

Looking for your sage advice here.
I made the NB extract kit for the Baltic Porter. Hit the OG more or less - OG 1.068.
Used WY2112

fermented at around 62ºF for 2 weeks primary.
Racked and left in secondary for 1.5mo.

Today I bottled for bottle conditioning and took a reading of 1.028. Too high. This puts my ABV at around 5.7%ish – too low ABV for the style.

It’s certainly beer. But I missed the style – would have like to have gotten to FG somewhere around 1.01, but not sure what else to have done.

I bottled a bit early as I was a bit nervous about a white film expanding on the top of the beer in the secondary. They are in big 32oz bottles and intend to leave them for some weeks/months before drinking.

My question is:
What could/should I have done to get to that FG?
I know the next Q might be: did you do a starter?
A: I can’t remember! :shock: probably. It was 2 mo ago.

Let me know your high-gravity suggestions. I owe so much of my learning to you all.

Thanks in advance.[/quote]

I don’t mean to sound like a smart*$##,but your real mistake here is waiting until bottling day to take a gravity reading.Never do that.Don’t assume that just because the wort should be done,or even that it might appear to be done,doesn’t mean that it is.If airlock activity appears to have ceased or slowed to a crawl,do a gravity reading before you do anything else.If you had done that,you would seen then that the wort was not fully fermented,and you could have done something like pitching more yeast or yeast energizer and/or giving the fermenter a gentle rousing,etc.That’s my advice for future reference.But there’s another very important point here:if there’s still fermentable sugar left in the wort,and you pitched in more yeast at bottling time,you could be sitting on some time bombs.I don’t mean to alarm you unnececssarily,but I’d be very careful when you open those bottles,and about where you store them.Open them in a shower and aim them away from yourself.I’m not kidding.If your final gravity was way above what it should have been,it’s entirely possible that the yeast in the bottles will finish eating that residual sugar and give you some seriously overcarbonated beer.If I hadn’t experienced that exact same scenario in years past myself,I wouldn’t be saying this,believe me.I’m not saying that you should panic,just be cautious,and don’t give out bottles of that beer to anyone until you’ve given it plenty of time (like a good 3 months) to verify that you don’t have any gushers before you share it with anyone.Just a little word to the wise. :slight_smile:

Thanks for the advice. I’ll certainly take it.

I did not pitch any more yeast at bottling. That would seem like a dumb move what with all that co2 and nowhere to go. That said, without new yeast, should I still assume these are bombs? I suppose to better safe than sorry…

So far, advice I’m hearing:

  • leave in primary until reaching a better gravity reading.
  • take more gravity readings over the coursed the fermentation
  • take notes on brew day
  • always open beer in the shower (ok that one is a joke…)
  • do take precautions if there are still ferment able sugars in the better and it’s bottled.

Thanks!
Any others?

You racked early, but you left it in secondary for quite a while, so you are probably fine. This kind of big beer will be best served by a good long primary fermentation next time. For this one, you may want to watch the bottles closely and store them in a plastic container in case you encounter any bottle bombs… But all things considered, you are likely fine…

:cheers:

[quote=“masquelle”]Thanks for the advice. I’ll certainly take it.

I did not pitch any more yeast at bottling. That would seem like a dumb move what with all that co2 and nowhere to go. That said, without new yeast, should I still assume these are bombs? I suppose to better safe than sorry…

So far, advice I’m hearing:

  • leave in primary until reaching a better gravity reading.
  • take more gravity readings over the coursed the fermentation
  • take notes on brew day
  • always open beer in the shower (ok that one is a joke…)
  • do take precautions if there are still ferment able sugars in the better and it’s bottled.

Thanks!
Any others?[/quote]

No,I think that pretty much covers it.I’m not kidding,though,about opening the beer in a shower.This kind of thing can happen with any beer,even when you thought for sure that there was no bacterial contamination and the carbonation was done.I just had to clear out some bottles to use for a new batch,so I emptied what was left of a red ale I brewed back in the spring that I wasn’t ever really happy with.I had a hunch that the bottles might be a bit “effervescent” :lol: at this point,because that batch was a little overcarbonated even back then.So I took a bottle out to test in my utility sink,pointed the opening of the bottle at the drain hole and cracked the cap,and BOOM!I felt like Jed Clampet,if you can recall that old TV reference.I’ve been brewing for about 16 years now,and that hasn’t happened to me in quite a few years.It goes to show that it can still happen,no matter how careful you are with sanitation and measuring your priming sugar.

[quote=“masquelle”]

Any others?[/quote]
One thing to consider is the kit itself. I have made it a number of times in the past
and looking at my notes I never got it below 1.026.
Not sure it is designed to go much lower, based on unfermentables in the extract.

I always used a starter. Also started brewing a cali common prior and using that cake for this beer…still finishes “high”.

Starting gravity should be 1.070 for this (hard to miss OG with extract, and assuming you made 5 gallons).
Too much top off water? Recalculating those 2 points might make you feel better. :wink:

Stick a few of those bottles away. It turns fantastic at about 6 months. :cheers:

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