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Losing CO2 with kegs in kegerator?

Does anyone else have problems keeping a keg sealed when the temperature in your kegerator is set at the mid 40s?

I recently purchased a chest freezer with a digital temperature override. I thought I would reaching a better deal, but I seem to keep losing Co2. I’ve gone through about 5 canisters of Co2.

I have a small co2 tank that goes into a 4 port distributor. With the problems persisting, I set it to my most dependable tank on it only with all the other ports shut off. My set point is mid 40s. It’s still just a chest freezer with no taps or collar placed on it (yet). I drilled one hole so I could place the Co2 tank outside of the kegerator at this point so I can keep a better eye on the gauges.

I’ve gone over the system everywhere with soapy water and still can’t quite identify where the leaking is? I went the last several day with the Co2 running and the gauges stayed where they should. Without touching anything, the gauge dropped from 600 psi to the red portion suggesting I need a refill. I’ve never had this problem until I started putting kegs into the freezer/kegerator.

This is maddening at $20 a refill. I just never thought this would be a problem.

Any thoughts?

Andrew

The temp shouldn’t have anything to do with leaking or shrinking of your gaskets. You’ve probably got a leak in your lines. Time to clamp and lube all your connections.

I cant imagine where it would be leaking other than the connects themselves or the tubing runs.

By connects I mean the corny connector has a o ring on the underside of the top cap with the big slot in it. I have never had a gas one leak here, but I have had a liquid one do it. So spray check that possibility.

Other than that any connector point in the tubing runs as you may have already from the sounds of it.

Another thing is you must always replace and/ or make certain the hard disk gasket where the regulator set stem connects to the bottle is in place. I typically spray any point of the system where a leak could occur such as the gauges(threads)bottle connection to gauges. Line run connectors. Disconnects, posts, etc…

Another thing that comes to mind although very slight chances, is a gas disconnect is on the post but the “collar” is not locked down on the post securely thus some gas is leaking because the connector is not “locked” down. On the topic of post it would also be very rare but after you have pressurized a keg take off the disconnect and spray the entire post especially the base of it to diagnose if the base itself is faulty…mind you this is really rare.

You say “small”, how small is small? Perhaps you’re just using it up thru despensing and absorbtion.

:cheers:

[quote=“apearson”]Does anyone else have problems keeping a keg sealed when the temperature in your kegerator is set at the mid 40s?

I recently purchased a chest freezer with a digital temperature override. I thought I would reaching a better deal, but I seem to keep losing Co2. I’ve gone through about 5 canisters of Co2.

I have a small co2 tank that goes into a 4 port distributor. With the problems persisting, I set it to my most dependable tank on it only with all the other ports shut off. My set point is mid 40s. It’s still just a chest freezer with no taps or collar placed on it (yet). I drilled one hole so I could place the Co2 tank outside of the kegerator at this point so I can keep a better eye on the gauges.

I’ve gone over the system everywhere with soapy water and still can’t quite identify where the leaking is? I went the last several day with the Co2 running and the gauges stayed where they should. Without touching anything, the gauge dropped from 600 psi to the red portion suggesting I need a refill. I’ve never had this problem until I started putting kegs into the freezer/kegerator.

This is maddening at $20 a refill. I just never thought this would be a problem.

Any thoughts?

Andrew[/quote]

I just emptied my 5lb tank with the same setup, 4-way distributor and 4 kegs. I carbed and dispensed 8 kegs. Check and recheck all the connections. Shut off all the valves and start working your way down from the regulator. Test each keg independently by only opening that keg’s valve at the distributor. If you don’t detect a leak, take off the your gas line and dispensing line and test the posts. I’ve had one tiny leak from a poppet that didn’t seat right. I check my posts and poppits before hooking up to the gas for this reason. It’s tough to track down a gas leak with a large system and so many points that could possibly leak. If all else fails, unbutton everything and relube and seal every part of the system.

Sniff test works for me. Disconnect everything from the CO2 tank except the regulator and turn on the gas. Wait 24 hours, then lean over and stick your head in the kegerator - any burn in the nostrils? If yes, there’s the leaking component. If not, open the regulator to the manifold. Wait 24, sniff. If no burn, attach one keg, wait 24, sniff. Repeat with each keg until you find the component that’s leaking. The beauty of this method is that as you eliminate each keg, you can keep it on the gas knowing that it’s good.

If you have those shut off valves it may be the problem.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/shut ... 4-mfl.html

I’ve had more problems with them leaking to the point that I won’t use them at all, I just use a check valve and disconnect the gas from the keg.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/ball ... valve.html

One other thing you are using the this nylon washer where any metal to metal connects.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/cata ... lt/?q=k127

When you have a small herd of cornys a pressure tester is really helpful. The host sells one for the same price as putting your own together (unless you have some of the parts). I bought a 4 pack of cornys from sabco and had a very slow leak issue with a couple. It would take days for one to drop pressure, ended up needing to bend the lid legs for a tad more seal compression.

If the connections or keg seals aren’t the problem make sure your checking for leaks that may originating from under the rubber collars (handle). I have one that developed an extremely fine hairline stress crack at that externally placed weldnut for the handle. Drove me nuts until I soaked the whole top with starsan and the saw some very fine foam peeking from under the edge of the collar. Years of hoisting with liquid took a toll.

As mentioned before, the crush washer between tank and reg is meant to be replaced every time you put on the regulator. That can be a tough spot to check with that collar nut.
How old is you regulator? Maybe a rebuild kit needed.

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