Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Landshark recipie?

I had this posted in the General section and another user thought it may get better mileage here. I understand that I need to have the equipment for Lagering. No problem. Here is the orginal post.

Hello to everyone. First let me say that I am relatively new to home brewing. As of right now, I only have the equipment to do extract brewing.

I am a lover of many types of beer. IPAs, Porters, Stouts, micro brews and macro brews. I recently finished a Pete’s Wicked Ale kit that is a nice dark ale with a great taste.

I am looking to do a batch for the summer. I know many people love Corona, but for me I can’t do it. I really like the flavor and drinkability of Landshark. Does anyone have a recipie for something very similar to Landshark that can be converted to an extract kit? 5 gallon batch.

I know it is an A-B product and that alone will draw criticism from many. I get it, but people like what they like.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Cheers!!

do you have the ability to lager?

I have the extra fridge, just need the temp control.

This is shaky ground because you’re asking homebrewers about a style that they rarely make and then saying that you can do one brand but not another. There have been brewers on forums asking for a recipe for Miller Lite but that they cannot stand Bud Light. While that’s a tall order, at least one could say that one version is made with rice and one is made with corn. My first question for you would be… what is it that you like about Landshark that you don’t like about Corona? I’ve tried them both and they taste so similar to me I can’t make much of a distinction between the two. But if you absolutely had to make something to get a feel for it (something you could adjust over time), you could do something along these lines. Keep in mind this is just a recipe for a wimpy gold lager that might get you into the zip code of Landshark lager. This is all extract… no steeping grains because I can’t imagine any specialty grains in the beer at all.

[b]Landshark extract

4.25 lbs extra-light DME
1.00 lbs brewer’s corn syrup (this is available at most LHBSs)
1 oz Hallertau pellets 4.2% for 60 mins
Wyeast 2007 American Lager yeast

OG: 1.047, FG: 1.012, IBU: 17, SRM: 2-3, ABV: 4.5%[/b]

The key to what you like about Landshark may be the yeast. This is AB’s house yeast and is often referred to as “St. Louis”. This is a beer where there is very little flavor so the profile contributed by the yeast may be what you like. You could use Hallertau as the hop and also something else mild like Tettnanger, Spalt, Hersbrucker and maybe even Mt. Hood or Liberty. These are all clean, neutral hops. There are other varieties that could work as well. You could also add a small amount of hops in the last 10 minutes of the boil just to give the suggestion of hop flavor although I don’t think the commercial version has any. Simply heat your water, add the extracts, get it to a boil, add the hops and watch it bubble for an hour. I would not make the beer unless I were doing an full-volume boil and I would probably use bottled spring water or something along those lines to make sure that nothing in your tap water would interfere with the light and wispy flavor (read: no flavor) of the beer. Don’t get me wrong… I make “summer lagers” all the time but I have never attempted anything quite this light. It’s probably the toughest style to make consistently well. There is a lager page on my site, link below, go to MAKING LAGERS. Good luck.

[quote=“Ken Lenard”]This is shaky ground because you’re asking homebrewers about a style that they rarely make and then saying that you can do one brand but not another. There have been brewers on forums asking for a recipe for Miller Lite but that they cannot stand Bud Light. While that’s a tall order, at least one could say that one version is made with rice and one is made with corn. My first question for you would be… what is it that you like about Landshark that you don’t like about Corona? I’ve tried them both and they taste so similar to me I can’t make much of a distinction between the two. But if you absolutely had to make something to get a feel for it (something you could adjust over time), you could do something along these lines. Keep in mind this is just a recipe for a wimpy gold lager that might get you into the zip code of Landshark lager. This is all extract… no steeping grains because I can’t imagine any specialty grains in the beer at all.

[b]Landshark extract

4.25 lbs extra-light DME
1.00 lbs brewer’s corn syrup (this is available at most LHBSs)
1 oz Hallertau pellets 4.2% for 60 mins
Wyeast 2007 American Lager yeast

OG: 1.047, FG: 1.012, IBU: 17, SRM: 2-3, ABV: 4.5%[/b]

The key to what you like about Landshark may be the yeast. This is AB’s house yeast and is often referred to as “St. Louis”. This is a beer where there is very little flavor so the profile contributed by the yeast may be what you like. You could use Hallertau as the hop and also something else mild like Tettnanger, Spalt, Hersbrucker and maybe even Mt. Hood or Liberty. These are all clean, neutral hops. There are other varieties that could work as well. You could also add a small amount of hops in the last 10 minutes of the boil just to give the suggestion of hop flavor although I don’t think the commercial version has any. Simply heat your water, add the extracts, get it to a boil, add the hops and watch it bubble for an hour. I would not make the beer unless I were doing an full-volume boil and I would probably use bottled spring water or something along those lines to make sure that nothing in your tap water would interfere with the light and wispy flavor (read: no flavor) of the beer. Don’t get me wrong… I make “summer lagers” all the time but I have never attempted anything quite this light. It’s probably the toughest style to make consistently well. There is a lager page on my site, link below, go to MAKING LAGERS. Good luck.[/quote]

Also you are going to want to ferment it around 45-48F

[quote=“Wahoo”]
Also you are going to want to ferment it around 45-48F[/quote]
I know he said he has the extra fridge so I hope he knows that. It will be critical for such a light beer. If the OP has any other questions, a lot of the lager process is explained in better detail on my lager page. Cheers.

If you’re new to homebrewing, don’t make a lager. I would recommend making a cream ale or blond ale. They’re kinda like light lagers.

And make sure to pitch a huge amount of yeast. Better yet, buy Landshark and brew some ales to get the hang of brewing before attempting a light lager.

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com