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Kegging beer that requires long bottling time?

For beers that require long bottling time what effect does that have on the beer when you plan to keg it? Do you still just keg it and adjust co2 like you would for say a 6 week kit that Northern Brewer offers?

What do you mean by adjusting the co2? And are you referring to 6 weeks as a long time or do you mean a year or more?

Maybe a better approach would be to explain what the beer is and is it something you’re planning to drink quickly when it’s ready or some other reason that you plan to keg instead of bottle it? Kegging is really easy but if it’s a beer that needs to age, I’d recommend bottling it.

I keg basically everything but bottled a Belgian Strong that I’m aging. It’s nice to easily sample how it’s doing but not have it take up any of my taps.

A keg is one big bottle (can)

As Meerts said, it depends on the number of kegs/tap you have and if you want to tie one up for an extended period of time.

I’ll try this again. A typical Northern brewer 6 week extract kit suggests 1 - 2 week bottle time (conditioning) but one can go ahead and keg it. For a kit that suggest a bottle time of a month or more do you treat it the same?

I see. That makes sense now. :slight_smile:

I think it depends on your system and the beer. If the choice is having an empty tap or having that beer hooked up, there would be no question for me that you should hook it up (just don’t drink it all at once!). If it’s supposed to improve over time and you also have an IPA ready and have to decide which to hook up, I’d go with the IPA. But there’s no reason not to keg it, add at least enough co2 to purge the oxygen.

If you have the space, you can drink it occasionally and follow as the beer develops over time and get a better sense of what happens to your beer.

I think most NB kits are 6 week beers. Following the 1-2-3 rule. (1 week primary, 2 weeks bright tank, 3 weeks in the bottle)

Some of these are even better if they sit 4 weeks or more in the bottle.

If you have the space in the keg fridge, set it in there to age and put the gas to it. You don’t “have” to serve it.

If you don’t have space inside, I would purge the head space, and put 40-50psi on it. Every couple days after, bump the CO2 back in at 35psi. At room temp that should get to clocse to carbonated.

I think most NB kits are 6 week beers. Following the 1-2-3 rule. (1 week primary, 2 weeks bright tank, 3 weeks in the bottle)

Some of these are even better if they sit 4 weeks or more in the bottle.

If you have the space in the keg fridge, set it in there to age and put the gas to it. You don’t “have” to serve it.

If you don’t have space inside, I would purge the head space, and put 40-50psi on it. Every couple days after, bump the CO2 back in at 35psi. At room temp that should get to close to carbonated.

99% of the beer that i brew I keg within 2 weeks and im drinking them in 2 and a half. Some of them get better after they have a couple of weeks on them.

You can age a keg just like a bottle if you want. Just clear the O2 with co2 and let it sit at cellar temps or keep it in the fridge as long as you want. It will age similar to a bottle

You can also add bottling sugar to a keg to mimic bottle conditioning

Thanks for all the info guys.

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