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Judging help: BJCP Categories for contest entry

I have a few beers that I’m entering in competition, and was wondering if someone could help me with which categories they should be entered.

First is a Belgian farmhouse ale fermented on coffee beans. Color and body are light, OG was 1.042, and the coffee aroma is pronounced. Should I enter it in category 16E-Belgian Specialty ale or 21A as a Spice Herb or Vegetable beer? 21A needs to specify an underlying style- I guess it’s closer to a Saison category 16c than a Blond Ale category 18A?

Second is a red colored ale aged on oak. Not based on any particular style. From the BJCP Category22c Wood-Aged Beer: IF THIS BEER IS BASED ON A CLASSIC STYLE (E.G., ROBUST PORTER) THEN THE SPECIFIC STYLE MUST BE SPECIFIED. CLASSIC STYLES DO NOT HAVE TO BE CITED (E.G., “PORTER” OR “BROWN ALE” IS ACCEPTABLE). THE TYPE OF WOOD MUST BE SPECIFIED IF A “VARIETAL” CHARACTER IS NOTICEABLE.

Is it ok just to enter it in Category 22c and call it an Oak Aged Red Ale? Or should I just be vague and call it an Oak Aged Ale to avoid confusion with 9D Irish Red Ale?

Thanks in advance!

First one is a 16E Belgian Specialty. Second one is a 22C Oak Aged American Amber Ale. Done.

+1 to Dave’s suggestions.

If you specify a base style it will be judged looking for those characteristics as well as whatever made it special (in your case, coffee). If it doesn’t fit a category I wouldn’t specify one. With Belgian specialty it will just have to have some spicy yeast character.

How long did you age your red ale on oak?

[quote=“tom sawyer”]+1 to Dave’s suggestions.

If you specify a base style it will be judged looking for those characteristics as well as whatever made it special (in your case, coffee). If it doesn’t fit a category I wouldn’t specify one. With Belgian specialty it will just have to have some spicy yeast character.

How long did you age your red ale on oak?[/quote]

That’s what i was thinking rearding base style. Most of what i brew is not based on any particular style, so I’d rather be judged on if it is a quality, balanced beer, rather than if it fits into certain parameters.

The red ale was aged on oak for about four weeks. Possibly too long, but the flavor is more bold and less subtle.

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