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Is my beer dead?

Making beer for the first time using the Deluxe Brewing Starter Kit. Attempting to make the Wheat Ale that came with the kit and I’m about 72 hours in. The first 48 hours everything seemed like it was going great. Good amount of foam and bubbles through the airlock. Now I have almost no foam and no bubbles. The problem could be that this it’s temperature is 76-78.

Can anyone tell me if I blew this batch or not? Any way to recover if I did?

You fermented way too hot, it’s probably done, but I’d let it sit for a few weeks and then botle/keg. It should still be ok/drinkable, but next time find a way to ferment in the low 60s(fridge, swamp cooler, cold basement) I think there is a thread under General that has a list for beginner brewers that you should probably check out. Good luck

Yeah, I figured. I got a little impatient. It was rough staring at all that gear and not being able to do anything with it. Plus some friends had a similar kit and said they were fine at that temp. Regardless, thanks for the info. I’ll give it some time and see how it goes.

This beer was the second that I ever made. I had no idea about fermentation temps, so I did everything at room temp, which at the time was about 70, which means that the beer temp during fermentation was probably 75-78. I had added coriander and orange peel to mine. Had a good two days of activity, then nothing. Bottled after two weeks primary, then in bottles at room temp for 3 weeks. Ended up pretty good. You should be fine.

+1 to all that thome9 said.

The first beer I brewed finished way quicker than I thought it would. The Caribou Slobber kit, it fermented vigorously (blowoff tube) for two days and then died out pretty quick. I was really upset, ended up buying a hydrometer and the gravity was where it should have been. I would suggest getting a gravity reading, and if all else fails just give it a week or two. Those yeast might be doing their best but not showing much for it.

Just remember, converting sugar to alcohol is the yeast’s PRIMARY job, but not it’s only job.

It’s like a carpenter building a house; the big bubbling is like doing the framing and roof trusses. It’s a job where you can see a lot of progress very quickly. Now that the framing is done, the yeasties can get to work on the beer’s finish carpentry; they’ll convert other nasty compounds into deliciousness.

Anyway, the process isn’t “done” when the bubbling slows. That’s just an indication that you’re moving from active fermentation into conditioning.

Note: I am neither a carpenter nor a yeast; apologies if I offended either with my analogy.

JMck, your analogy was absolutely perfect. I AM a builder, and your explanation really made sense to me. It’s just hard for us newbies to feel like there’s something going on when there is no discernable activity to the casual observer. Thanks. :cheers:

[quote=“JMcK”]Just remember, converting sugar to alcohol is the yeast’s PRIMARY job, but not it’s only job.

It’s like a carpenter building a house; the big bubbling is like doing the framing and roof trusses. It’s a job where you can see a lot of progress very quickly. Now that the framing is done, the yeasties can get to work on the beer’s finish carpentry; they’ll convert other nasty compounds into deliciousness.

Anyway, the process isn’t “done” when the bubbling slows. That’s just an indication that you’re moving from active fermentation into conditioning.

Note: I am neither a carpenter nor a yeast; apologies if I offended either with my analogy.[/quote]

Nice analogy.

To the OP, see my signature line for ways to keep the fermenter cool.

I too like the analogy JMcK. These replies are making me more positive that this will still work out. So thanks for that. However, it leaves me with another question. Reading over the instructions they say slow to no bubbles is an indicator of the fermentation process being done. Then move to secondary or bottling. If this isn’t necessarily the case what is the best indicator, or tool, I can use to know when it is time to move on?

The way to tell fermentation is done is to take a hydrometer reading a couple days apart. Same reading means it’s done. For some reason NB has quit including a hydrometer in their kits.

99% of the time the beer will be done in 7 days. But letting it sit for 14 days give the yeast the time to “clean up”. And there is no problem leaving it sit for 21 days, or more.

When you do go to bottle, fill 1 soda bottle with the beer. Squeeze the O2 out and screw the cap on. The bottle will expand as CO2 is formed. No wondering what is happening in the glass bottles. Even though the soda bottle is firm, allow them to set for 3 weeks. Then refrigerate a couple bottles for 48 hr. Then enjoy!

Your patience will be taxed. But the reward is worth it.

Just wanted to thank everyone again. Cracked open the first bottle and it was pretty good. Pouring the second one now. Cheers!

You have a second batch going right?

Congratulations on make a drinkable beer!

[quote=“Nighthawk”]You have a second batch going right?

Congratulations on make a drinkable beer![/quote]

That was my mistake I was like yayyyy I made beer - then it ran out. That never happened again…

I have a similar question. The instructions say 1-2 weeks of primary fermentation. My beer was over active during the 1st 24 hours (had to put a blowoff hose in). I moved my beer to cooler surroundings and put my airlock back on a few hours less than 48 hours after starting fermentation (filling carboy and putting the airlock on-had the blowoff hose on for about 12 hours). Tomorrow will be 1 week of primary. I’m not see any activity in the airlock at this point. Should I move on to secondary or let things sit longer?

Thanks

[quote=“bbella”]I have a similar question. The instructions say 1-2 weeks of primary fermentation. My beer was over active during the 1st 24 hours (had to put a blowoff hose in). I moved my beer to cooler surroundings and put my airlock back on a few hours less than 48 hours after starting fermentation (filling carboy and putting the airlock on-had the blowoff hose on for about 12 hours). Tomorrow will be 1 week of primary. I’m not see any activity in the airlock at this point. Should I move on to secondary or let things sit longer?

Thanks[/quote]

Easy answer: Probably fine to rack now.

If the high fermentation happened that quickly it was probably done in 4 or 5 days. If you need to move it to a secondary I would usually do so after the first week.

My question is do you have to move it to a secondary? Are you dry hopping or doing anything else that requires a secondary? If not, why not just leave it for 3 weeks in the primary and drink a beer instead?

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