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Irish Red got too warm, am I doomed?

So I brewed up a 5 gallon batch of NB Irish Red on Saturday. By Sunday it was bubbling/fermenting away very nicely. By Monday morning the temp had gotten into the high 70’s and the bubbling had stopped (or slowed very significantly). Spent the day looking for solutions for the cooling problem, finally “built” a swamp cooler that has got the temp down to around 74-75 degrees. My question is, is this batch DOA? I mean it was the best ferment I’ve ever seen and then it seemed to be gone in 24 hours. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Northern Brewer Irish Red
Dry Yeast (pitched below 70 degrees)
Clarity Ferm (trying to reduce gluten, pitched with yeast)

:?:

Might’ve generated some higher alcohols with that temp. But you won’t know for sure for a while. I had an ale get a little warm last summer. I was worried about it at kegging, but it cooled off with a little time and turned out really good.

Thanks for the words of encouragement! My temp is down to between 70-72 so I guess it’s now just wait and see.

Pain controling temps this time of year. I’m brewing Belgians, they like it warm.

You will be fine! Any warm alcohol flavors produced die to temp will fade over time. Enjoy the beer. It’s a decent kit!

*due… Fusel alcohol flavor

So my second question here would be why did my fermentation seem to “stop” so quickly? It was just bubbling away at a great clip once it started up and then seemed to go to nothing in 24 hours. Does this sound normal?

FYI this is only my third brew so if I’m asking a lot of newbie questions I apologize. Also if I understand what I’ve read I can check the fermentation by taking hydrometer readings to make sure it’s still changing correct? If so how often should I check it?

Fermentation can happen in that short of a period at those temps. I had this happen with my first batch-caribou slobber. Turned out very drinkable and was pretty good after a couple of months in the bottle.

I don’t normally take a hydrometer reading until after the second week in the fermentor. Even after the active part of fermentation is over, the yeast are still at work cleaning up. I never bottle before three weeks in fermentor for a normal beer, so for me there’s no need to do a reading until after week 2. Then another reading about 3 days later to confirm that the yeast is done. You want two similar hydro readings at least two or three days apart before proceeding.

Cheers,

Ron

Which dry yeast are you using? I just brewed the Dry Dock SS Minnow Mild using Safale S-04. I rehydrated before pitching, it hit full krausen after 7 hours and by 48 hours the krausen dropped completely. Despite the carboy being in a swamp cooler, the temperature hovered around 70 degrees F until Day 7, after which the temperature dropped to 66 degrees F (signaling to me that active fermentation had ended.)

I used Danstar Nottingham Ale Yeast. I rehydrated it per the instructions on the packet and it looked like it was already starting to foam in a couple of minutes, before I even pitched it.

I had similar results, it went crazy by the next day and now the krausen appears to be falling. My temp (with swamp cooler) is also dropping nicely now.

+1 I do try to start them in the 60’s then if they warm into the 70’s and I can’t control it then wait and see. Honestly the fusel alcohol thing has never been much of an issue. If the fermentation gets out of control hot then sure. I do keep a window a/c in the room my fermenters are in. Unless it gets really hot outside it will keep it in the high 60’s.

The higher temps will make a faster fermentation and Nottingham yeast takes off pretty good anyway.

+1 I do try to start them in the 60’s then if they warm into the 70’s and I can’t control it then wait and see. Honestly the fusel alcohol thing has never been much of an issue. If the fermentation gets out of control hot then sure. I do keep a window a/c in the room my fermenters are in. Unless it gets really hot outside it will keep it in the high 60’s.

The higher temps will make a faster fermentation and Nottingham yeast takes off pretty good anyway.[/quote]

So my next question is I’ve seen many people say that higher temps (and Nottingham yeast) ferment faster…how long should I expect to leave my beer in primary? Recipe calls for 2 weeks, is it going to be less than that?

The bulk of fermentation may be complete but the beer could still benefit by being on the yeast cake for a few more days.

On that beer I’d say take a gravity reading at 10 days, then again 2-3 days later. If it’s the same it’s ready for bottle or kegging.

Thanks for the advice, I’ll give that a shot.

[quote=“dannyboy58”]The bulk of fermentation may be complete but the beer could still benefit by being on the yeast cake for a few more days.

On that beer I’d say take a gravity reading at 10 days, then again 2-3 days later. If it’s the same it’s ready for bottle or kegging.[/quote]

+1 on this advice^

You didn’t mention if you plan on racking to a secondary. I don’t bother I just leave it in the primary for three weeks sometimes longer if I don’t have time to bottle or keg. I don’t think its that critical, if it’s done early it’s not going to hurt it to let it age in the fermenter an extra week or so it will only get better… Don’t rush it . Of course that is only my opinion. Brew on

Just to update all those that were kind enough to offer advice on my Irish Red. I took a reading at 10 days as suggested (1.01 down from original of 1.04). What I did notice though is that when I replaced the blowoff hose with an airlock I started getting bubbles immediately! Small bubbles but bubbles nonetheless. I’m hoping that this means fermentation is still going on, I’ll take another reading in a couple of days to see what’s happening. Took a taste test too (because duh), didn’t taste horrible…clearly not finished yet but not bad. Keeping my fingers crossed!

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