Imperial Stout

15 lbs Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM) Grain 75.00 %
3 lbs Victory Malt (25.0 SRM) Grain 15.00 %
1 lbs Chocolate Wheat Malt (400.0 SRM) Grain 5.00 %
1 lbs Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM) Grain 5.00 %
2.00 oz Magnum [14.00 %] (60 min) Hops 74.2 IBU

2 packs US-05 non re-hydrated
90 min boil
no sparge

Beer Profile

Est Original Gravity: 1.095 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.018 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 10.11 %
Bitterness: 74.2 IBU
Est Color: 49.3 SRM

i’m going to do a no-sparge on this beer and make a second small beer. Anyone know approximately how much loss of efficiency i will get from a no sparge? I’ve never made a stout without crystal, so i’m kinda wondering if victory will be a good replacement. i’ve also never made a stout with a grain bill this simple. I was considering replacing some of the marris otter with some 6-row for some grainy flavor, anyone done this in a stout? anyone know how much i’d need for it to be subtle but noticeable? anything stand out? (edit: addition): also thinking about brown malt, but dont know how much is ‘too much’ maybe 5%?

For me, the average no sparge efficiency is 55-65%, but others claim higher. The Victory won’t have the same affect as crystal, but it sounds good…as long as you’re aware of the difference. I don’t think you’d have anything to gain from using 6 row. I think the brown malt is a great idea and I’d probably go about 10%. By way of comparison, here’s a killer recipe from Bill Piece for his clone of Old Rasputin. I brewed it for my 100th batch many years ago.

ProMash Recipe Printout
Recipe : Rootin’ Tootin’ Rasputin (IS)
BJCP Style and Style Guidelines

12-C Barleywine & Imperial Stout, Russian Imperial Stout
Min OG: 1.075 Max OG: 1.095
Min IBU: 50 Max IBU: 90
Min Clr: 20 Max Clr: 40 Color in SRM, Lovibond

Recipe Specifics

Batch Size (GAL): 5.25 Wort Size (GAL): 5.25
Total Grain (LBS): 17.38
Anticipated OG: 1.088 Plato: 21.04
Anticipated SRM: 51.9
Anticipated IBU: 81.8
System Efficiency: 75
Wort Boil Time: 120 Minutes

Formulas Used

Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Tinseth
Tinseth Concentration Factor: 1.19
Additional Utilization Used For Pellet Hops: 5

Grain/Extract/Sugar
% Amount Name Origin Gravity SRM

74.8 13.00 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) America 1.036 2
8.6 1.50 lbs. Brown Malt Great Britain 1.032 70
4.3 0.75 lbs. Crystal 120L America 1.032 120
3.6 0.63 lbs. Chocolate Malt America 1.029 350
3.6 0.63 lbs. Roasted Barley America 1.028 450
2.9 0.50 lbs. Victory Malt America 1.034 25
2.2 0.38 lbs. Black Patent Malt America 1.028 525

Hops
Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time

1.38 oz. Cluster Pellet 7.00 28.7 105 min.
0.75 oz. Centennial Pellet 10.50 23.5 105 min.
1.50 oz. Liberty Pellet 4.00 12.7 30 min.
1.00 oz. Northern Brewer Pellet 8.00 16.9 30 min.
1.00 oz. Liberty Pellet 4.00 0.0 Dry Hop

Extras
Amount Name Type Time

1.00 Tsp Irish Moss Fining 15 Min.(boil)

Yeast

WYeast 1272 American Ale II (primary yeast cake from previous batch)
Red Star Dry Champagne Yeast (bottling)

Mash Schedule

Mash Type: Single Step
Qts Water Per LBS Grain: 1.25 Total Qts: 21.73
Saccharification Rest Temp : 152 Time: 90
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 10
Sparge Temp : 170 Time: 45

Fermentation Schedule

Primary Fermentation: 14 days at 65 F
Secondary Fermentation: 28 days at 65 F
Bottle Conditioning: 120 days at 60 F

Great! thanks for the advice. And that looks like a great recipe, i’ll have to brew it sometime. I tweaked mine a little bit, and i think I’m gonna go for it. i lowered the victory and base malt a little to account for the added brown malt and keep the OG under 1.100, i also added a later EKG addition to increase my IBU little (and mimic the estimated Rasputin IBU). here’s what i have now

14 lbs 8.0 oz Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM) Grain 70.73 %
2 lbs Brown Malt (65.0 SRM) Grain 9.76 %
2 lbs Victory Malt (25.0 SRM) Grain 9.76 %
1 lbs Chocolate Wheat Malt (400.0 SRM) Grain 4.88 %
1 lbs Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM) Grain 4.88 %
2.00 oz Magnum [14.00 %] (60 min) Hops 73.4 IBU
1.00 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %] (30 min) Hops 10.1 IBU

2 packs us-05 non rehydrated
no sparge
90 min boil
65% efficiency

Beer Profile

Est Original Gravity: 1.096 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.018 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 10.28 %
Bitterness: 83.4 IBU
Est Color: 53.5 SRM

Looks good to me!

To estimate no-sparge efficiency, just divide the volume in the kettle by the volume in the mash. So with 20lbs of grain, you’re looking at ~2.5 gallons of wort held in the grain and with a 90-min boil you might start out with 6.5 gallons in the kettle, and your efficiency will be 6.5 / (6.5 + 2.5) = 72%. This is the absolute best you can achieve, so you might want to plan on 60-65% if you know that you can’t get all the wort out of the MT or don’t usually get full conversion.

Awesome, thanks for the info. I’m shooting for anywhere between 1.088 (60%) and 1.095 (65%) then i will adjust my hops accordingly

Thanks again, :cheers:

On big beers I use all of the water in the mash, based on boil length, rate ect., and get 65% eff. with no sparge. That’s true for say 25lbs of grain in a 6 gallon batch. With a smaller beer I do a little better, maybe up to 72% or so because the water/grain ratio is higher.

This doesn’t have much (if anything) to do with your recipe but I have been thinking about this beer since I found it online and felt the need to share it. It was Brew Your Own’s 10th anniversary Imperial Stout recipe.

BYO 10th Anniversary Ale (Imperial American Stout)

5 gallons/19 L, all-grain; OG = 1.103 FG = 1.026; IBU = 60 SRM = 69 ABV = 10%

Ingredients:

13 lbs. 2 oz. (6.0 kg) 2-row pale malt
2.75 lbs. (1.25 kg) Munich malt (10 °L)
5.0 lbs. (2.3 kg) flaked barley
2.0 oz. (57 g) biscuit malt
5.0 oz. (142 g) crystal malt (40 °L)
3.0 oz. (85 g) crystal malt (60 °L)
2.0 oz. (57 g) crystal malt (90 °L)
4.0 oz. (113 g) chocolate malt
12.0 oz. (340 g) roasted barley (500 °L)
2.0 oz. (57 g) black patent malt
25 AAU Centennial hops (10 additions) (2.5 oz./71 g of 10% alpha acids)
1/4 tsp yeast nutrients
1 tsp Irish moss
Wyeast 1056 (American Ale) or White Labs WLP001 (California Ale) yeast
(4 qt./4 L yeast starter)
0.75 cups corn sugar (for priming)

To develop a highly-fermentable wort, follow this step-mash procedure. Heat 7.25 gallons (27 L) of water to 142 °F (61 °C) and stir the grains into this water (in your kettle). Adjust temperature, if needed, to 131 °F (55 °C) and rest for 15 minutes. Heat mash to 140 °F (60 °C) and hold for 15 minutes. (Stir nearly constantly when heating mash. Raise temperature at rate of about 2 °F (1 °C) per minute.)

Heat again to 149 °F (65 °C) and hold for 45 minutes. Heat to 162 °F (72 °C) and hold for 5 minutes, then heat to 167 °F (75 °C) and transfer mash to lauter tun. Recirculate for 15–20 minutes, then begin running off wort. Heat about 7 gallons (26 L) of sparge water to 170 °F (77 °C). (Use180–190 °F/82–88 °C sparge water if grain bed temperature drops below 165 °F/74 °C.) Collect 11.5 gallons (44 L) of wort and boil for about 5 hours to reduce volume to about 5.33 gallons (20 L) at the end of the boil.

Divide hops into ten 0.25 oz. (7.1 g) charges and add one charge with 90, 80, 70, 60, 50, 40, 30, 20 and 10 minutes left in the boil. Add the final hop addition at the end of the boil. Add Irish moss and yeast nutrients with 15 minutes left in boil.

That beer looks pretty epic. But if it were me i wouldn’t bother with all the hop additions, and just do a larger single addition or two. I also wouldn’t bother with all the mash temperature changes. I’d mash it at 149 for 60-90 mins. but that’s just what i would do. I’m sure its great as-is since it was brew your own’s 10th anniversary

:cheers:

brewed both beers yesterday. on my ‘no sparge’ i got a 1.090 which is perfect IMO. on the partigyle i added some malt extract and hit 1.059. i used just under two packets safale 05 on the first RIS and i used a packet of nottingham for the partigyle both pitched at 60F. i’m thinking the partigyle will turn into a dry stout, or maybe a porter. 10 gallons done, now the waiting begins.

thanks again for your help

update for anyone who’s interested

the RIS is aging in the keg right now. but the partygyle is in the kegerator and carbonated. i must say, this partygyle is better than the porter i made earlier this year that wasnt a partygyle. the chocolate wheat really shines through. it is between 5.5 and 6% abv and is very smooth. I just added some vanilla bourbon to my glass, and man, it taste awesome

one of the first few beers i’ve made where i really started to understand water chemistry and my water adjustments. and i can tell. sorry to brag. but i am proud of this beer

thanks for all the great advice

:cheers:

Your RIS recipe is very similar to my own: 20# grist, 2 packs SAF05, no crystal malt, 1# each of Roast and Chocolate.

On mine, I mash low (149F), and still get FG in the 1.023-1.025 range – I see you want it to attenuate more than that, which I think is a great plan. One thing different that you and I do, is I add 1# turbinado sugar (I added 2oz molasses as well). But like I said, that still only dries mine out to mid 20’s for a FG. Also, in my mind, with so much fermentables, I don’t like the idea of using sweet crystal malts. I figure there will be plenty of base-type malts that don’t get fermented out, leaving sugar behind.

Was just struck by how similar our recipes look.

nice! on the first taste (7 weeks out of primary) it was a little strong a little harsh, but i have experienced that before in big stouts. i’m letting it age in the keg at 63 degrees F untill its little brother (the partygyle) keg has kicked. pretty excited to try it in its full glory.

might also add a quarter cup of vanilla bourbon. still deciding though

…added a small amt of Madagascar vanilla bean-infused vodka to my RIS awhile back, and don’t regret it. Just a very small amount seems to bring all the dark chocolate, coffee, even hint of molasses flavors “up”. This RIS is from heaven. I call it “Soulsucker” and it’s a Missouri Imperial Stout. Sorry I keep talking about my baby, but that’s a father’s prerogative.

nothing wrong with being proud :cheers: . i sure am

this beer didnt attenuate as much as i would have liked. but i’m sure some aging and time will do wonders. last time i made a stout this big it ended at 1.030 (from 1.100, pretty sweet, but after a couple months it was still great) this time around it ended at 1.025, still a little high, but considering how good the other one was, despite the FG, i think it will be good. I think the issue was in my mash temp/time. or maybe an o2 issue… and i think the higher FG plays well with vanilla bourbon after reading through denny’s VIP thread. i took a gravity reading at 5 weeks, thought it was a little high, so i roused the yeast and raised the temp and gave it another 2 weeks, then kegged it up. i didnt take another reading, so hopefully that dropped the gravity a point or two; but i figured its done. and planned on aging it for a while anyway… i would be more concerned if i bottled. i will take another reading when i put it into the kegerator

next time i will do a longer mash at a little lower temperature

Any update on this stout? I plan on brewing one soon.

I know this thread is old, but I’ll jump in since it was recently revived.

Brewing my first Imperial Stout tomorrow. Will do a parti-gyle with second runnings.

21 2-Row
2 English Brown
1.25 Roast barley
.75 Chocolate
.5 Cr 120

10 IBU Santiam- FWH
65 IBU Magnum- 60

Two packs S-05

Boil the second runnings first while the big beer sits wrapped in a blanket or two. I find this extra wait acts as a really long mash and has helped with the fermentability of my bigger beers in the past.

Will hop the second runnings to 20 IBU at 60 mins with Willamette and ferment with WY1469.

*edited to say that this will be the 200th time firing up the burner. Hence the big beer…

[quote=“klyphman”]I know this thread is old, but I’ll jump in since it was recently revived.

Brewing my first Imperial Stout tomorrow. Will do a parti-gyle with second runnings.

21 2-Row
2 English Brown
1.25 Roast barley
.75 Chocolate
.5 Cr 120

10 IBU Santiam- FWH
65 IBU Magnum- 60

Two packs S-05

Boil the second runnings first while the big beer sits wrapped in a blanket or two. I find this extra wait acts as a really long mash and has helped with the fermentability of my bigger beers in the past.

Will hop the second runnings to 20 IBU at 60 mins with Willamette and ferment with WY1469.

*edited to say that this will be the 200th time firing up the burner. Hence the big beer…[/quote]
Not following you here. Do you put the first runnings back into the mashtun while the second boils?

No, it gets drained into a kettle then set aside. I have two kettles, but only one burner. That is why I did it in the first place, but I liked the results.