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Help, regulator keeps gaining pressure

Over the past month I have noticed my pours are coming out fast. When I check my regulator, it will read between 10-12psi. I will bleed the keg I am pouring out of and reset the pressure to 5 psi. Within a few hours the pressure is back up in the 10-12 psi range. Anyone have any idea why this may be happening?

If you store your tank cold it can do weird things to the regulator.

How is the beer? If it is excessively gassy, it could be that the beer is overcarbonnated and is itself pushing up the reading on the regulator.

[quote=“Brew Meister Smith”]If you store your tank cold it can do weird things to the regulator.

How is the beer? If it is excessively gassy, it could be that the beer is overcarbonnated and is itself pushing up the reading on the regulator.[/quote]

My tank is stored outside my kreezer at room temp. I wondered if it was possible that on of the kegs was over carbed as I did try to force carb two of them at 25-30 psi for 36-48 hours. However, when I relieved pressure on one of the beers (and turned the gas off to that keg), and then came back a day later, it had not built up enough pressure to pour.

Curious. Likely if there is enough gas in the beer to bring up the preasure on a guage to 10 psi, it would be able to push itself through your system.

I have one regulator myself that does some wierd things. It is one with a metal dial. Complete with preasure release valve. You seem to have to dial in what you want each time you turn the gas on. And every once in a while I will come back to it later on and it is either way up or way down.

I much prefer my old school regulator where you have to open and close the valve with a dime. Pain to adjust, but it never lets you down.

Wow, thread hijack right there…get your own thread lisaa!

Roddy, what regulator is it? I’ve heard of certain regulators being prone to creeping. Why not just keep it at 10-12 PSI from the start instead of burst carbing? Try that and see if it doesn’t solve the issue.

Sounds like an over carbed keg. Your quick carb method would support this theory. If you have check valves then it can’t be an overcarbed keg and is definitely your reg. If you’re going to quick force carb you should definitely have check valves.

Spammer. This is a copy of a post by hasseb432 on 11/18/14. Thought I read it somewhere…[/quote]
It’s a pretty specific post for spam. I mean, the person sounds like a dumbass like spammers do, but I didn’t see any links or any advertisements, so I didn’t think it was spam. Whatevs…

OP, quit quick carbing and do the set and forget it method. See if that isn’t what’s causing the regulator creep.

OP, I agree with Beersk. The CO2 isn’t fully hydrated for about 2 weeks anyway so might as well wait.

Beersk, here’s the post from above:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=122693&hilit=deluxe+jockey+box

Oddly enough it was the only post from that individual as well…

I’ve seen that signature line, aliiiii, on different spam.

Agree with Beersk, set it and forget it.

[quote=“Roddy”]Over the past month I have noticed my pours are coming out fast. When I check my regulator, it will read between 10-12psi. I will bleed the keg I am pouring out of and reset the pressure to 5 psi. Within a few hours the pressure is back up in the 10-12 psi range. Anyone have any idea why this may be happening?[/quote]That happens when one of the kegs is over carbed and slowly bleeds back through the check valve into the regulator. The keg could also be over carbed from a slight infection or continued fermentation.

If I was having the problem with the pressure increasing I would check to make sure that my regulator was locking up. It is a simple test to make sure your valve seat is seating properly on the orifice. Close your cylinder valve, then open your downstream valve and bleed the pressure off. Back the regulator all of the way out. With all of the pressure bleed off close the downstream valve off, then open the cylinder valve and adjust the pressure to 10 lbs. or so and let it sit for 10-15 mins. and see if the pressure rises. If you see a increase in pressure that means your regulator in not locking up. Then I would check the valve seat to make sure there was no debris between the orifice and valve seat keeping it from seating properly. Slivers of Teflon tape are good for finding their way through the piping system and getting lodged between the valve seat and orifice preventing your regulator from locking up. Also check for any bad spots in the valve seat, or nicks on the orifice face.

Good Luck,
Jazzman

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