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Hef question

I brewed on Saturday and pitched the yeast at 66 degrees. The temp has dropped but has been steady at around 60/62 for the last couple of days. I read that some of you place the fermenter in a warmer area after a few days to try to raise the temp of the beer a few degrees. Is this something I should do? Or will it be ok in the spot it is in for the next couple of weeks? Thanks.

Which yeast is this?

Wyeast 3068

I don’t brew many (any) hefes, but when using a hefe yeast with my weizenbock, I find that it works great down in the low 60’s. I’d keep it there for 3-4 days until you see the airlock activity start to slow, then bring it to a warmer spot. YMMV.

edit: The reason I do mine at the lower end is to minimize the banana esters and keep it more clovey/spicy with some light banana. If you want a banana bomb, go in the high 60’s sooner.

I don’t really do hefes much at all. Just looked up the strain on Wyeast site though. Lots of info on flavor variations from this strain at different temperatures and pitch rates.

If you have not already checked it out:

http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=135

[quote=“Pietro”]I don’t brew many (any) hefes, but when using a hefe yeast with my weizenbock, I find that it works great down in the low 60’s. I’d keep it there for 3-4 days until you see the airlock activity start to slow, then bring it to a warmer spot. YMMV.

edit: The reason I do mine at the lower end is to minimize the banana esters and keep it more clovey/spicy with some light banana. If you want a banana bomb, go in the high 60’s sooner.[/quote]
I do the same for the same reason. I also over pitch to enhance the clove aroma and flavor. Over pitching with 3068 may require a blow off tube.

I use that yeast for almost all wheats I brew. Have used it many, many time. And yes, you’ll get wildly different flavors when fermenting in the low 60’s compared to upper 60’s. To answer your question, it will ferment fine down in the low 60’s, but yes, you’ll get more clove and less banana. Flavors contributed by yeast are only produced in the first few days or so. After day 4-5, raising the temp won’t effect the flavor.

Just to experiment I once brewed a simple hefe and split the batch in two. Fermented 1/2 at 60F and the other 1/2 at 70F. I bottled some of each and then blended some of each back into a keg. The blended portion was the best of the three… at least according to me and a few friends.

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