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Filtering the pour

Hello again. Thanks to all for your helpful comments. This weekend, I plan on opening some of my first bottled beer that I started weeks ago. When I bottled, I added the fizz drop in each, then added the brew, then capped. Using a bright small flashlight, I can see particles on the bottom of each bottle. There are also assorted small particles floating on or suspended in the beer. I’m assuming these are all yeast, correct? Also, what is the best way to filter these particles out as I carefully pour from the bottle? THANKS!!

I don’t know any practical way to filter from a bottle. In time any suspended yeast, proteins or whatever will settle. Best bet to prevent chill haze and settle everything out is to refrigerate them for weeks at as close to freezing as possible. Before serving let them warm up slightly, doesn’t take much, then pour carefully as to not mix the gunk back in and leave a little in the bottom.

Try the same method for the weekend. It might not be perfect but you can always serve in opaque glasses :grin:

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Great advice from Mark. Chilling them will help drop that stuff out and with all craft beer it’s about the “art of the pour”. Keep in mind it’s your first and don’t be too hard on yourself. My first was a dumper but it taught me a lot.

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It will all settle to the bottom and you just won’t drink that part.

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If you are just checking, I don’t think it should matter. If you are opening to part take , the longer you let it sit in refrigerator the more it settles.

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Like @irishjoe says if you let it sit for awhile the crap settles and gets compact so it’s easy to pour off and leave the sediment. No big deal. When bottle conditioning I’ll leave it in the fermenter as long as I can stand it then cold crash before bottling. Don’t worry about yeast there is always plenty left

Thanks to all for your replies! Chilling is definitely the answer for me. I put several bottles in the frig (not freezer). Within one hour, the suspended yeast particulates and particles on the walls had fallen to the bottom. The beer appears clear. I’ll try it this weekend, using VERY careful pouring to avoid the junk at the bottom. Again, thanks!
PS: I really appreciate all the helpful comments to my several queries over these past weeks. Your feedback has been very helpful!

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We are all glad to help. We have all been there. I’ll say that my beers have much less sediment in them than the first 20 batches or so. I can’t cold crash but I don’t try to get every last drop out of my fermenter as I did in the beginning. Also there are certain yeasts the clump and flocculate easily so I lean towards those when I want a clear beer. But for me clear is not that important.

Half way. Of my years i brew. Became. To focused. On my beer. Become. Really clear. Ok i still do when i brew a pilsner. But now. When i have a brew after. Cold crash. And it still has some sediment. So be it. As long it taste good. And have some nice carbobation. And friends and fam. Like the brew. I am happy

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There will always settlement, leave 1/2 inch in the bottle, there will be lees in the glass.

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