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Dry Yeast vs Yeast Starter

I like using dry yeast (11g) packs because of the higher cell count over liquid and clean finish. I am kicking around the idea of doing a high gravity ale for my next batch. Like many, I have not used a yeast starter and I know they are not terribly difficult. However, could I get what I need from pitching 2, 11g packs of re-hydrated dry yeast or would a one smack pack/vial liquid yeast starter still be a better option?

Pitching two packets of dry yeast is the fast and easy way to do it. Or, make a 5-gal batch of something lower gravity and then use half the yeast cake for the big beer.

I’m not familiar with the yeast cake method?

If you don’t mind I’m going to add my question to this.

I’m brewing my second batch next week, it’ll be an ESB and I have a 11oz dry yeast pack. Should I make a starter, is there any reason not to? I am interested in trying different ways of doing things since I’m just starting out.

This is the best way to find out…mrmalty.conm

How high a gravity are you going for?

[quote=“schitzoflink”]If you don’t mind I’m going to add my question to this.

I’m brewing my second batch next week, it’ll be an ESB and I have a 11oz dry yeast pack. Should I make a starter, is there any reason not to? I am interested in trying different ways of doing things since I’m just starting out.[/quote]

DO NOT make a starter with dry yeast. First, there’s no need since the package contains so many cells as compared to liquid yeast. Second, dry yeast is coated with nutrients. Using those up in a starter can actually be detrimental.

[quote=“Denny”]
DO NOT make a starter with dry yeast. First, there’s no need since the package contains so many cells as compared to liquid yeast. Second, dry yeast is coated with nutrients. Using those up in a starter can actually be detrimental.[/quote]

Awesome, thanks!

[quote=“schitzoflink”][quote=“Denny”]
DO NOT make a starter with dry yeast. First, there’s no need since the package contains so many cells as compared to liquid yeast. Second, dry yeast is coated with nutrients. Using those up in a starter can actually be detrimental.[/quote]

Awesome, thanks![/quote]

Check out the mrmalty.com link I posted above. Lots of great info about yeast.

Brewers Friend yeast starter calculator has a selection tab for a starter with dry yeast.

http://www.brewersfriend.com/yeast-pitc ... alculator/

Fermentis cautions that the yeast must be rehydrated before being added to the starter wort. Once the dry yeast has been correctly rehydrated it has the same characteristics as liquid yeast.

This is the best way to find out…mrmalty.conm

How high a gravity are you going for?[/quote]

I was hoping to finish in the 8% range.

[quote=“Denny”][quote=“schitzoflink”][quote=“Denny”]
DO NOT make a starter with dry yeast. First, there’s no need since the package contains so many cells as compared to liquid yeast. Second, dry yeast is coated with nutrients. Using those up in a starter can actually be detrimental.[/quote]

Awesome, thanks![/quote]

Check out the mrmalty.com link I posted above. Lots of great info about yeast.[/quote]

That calculator was exactly what I was looking for. Many thanks.

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