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Dry Hopping

What is the purpose of dry hopping? Is it completely necessary? Is it going to effect clarity?

Purpose? - adding aroma

Necessary? - Thats a matter of opinion, more the brewers preference than anything.

Clarity issues? - Not that I’ve personally noticed. I keg so I definitely get hop floaties after dry hopping but I don’t mind them.

Dry hopping adds a huge amount of aroma to your beer. I don’t get floaties and I dump the pellets into the secondary and let gravity and time work for two weeks. Transfer to kegs with a screen on the end of the racking tube to catch any pieces of hop material. The beer will have such a huge nose that you will know what it is before it ever touches your lips.

Keep reading about dry hop duration… anyone here care to voice a preference? I see times that vary from a few days, to a few weeks? I am going to be bottling an IPA in 2 weeks, and am wondering when to dry hop? I’ll be using 1oz of chinook hops. Thinking either two weeks vs 1 week. Let me know what you guys think.

  • Jeff

[quote=“jeffsmietana”]Keep reading about dry hop duration… anyone here care to voice a preference? I see times that vary from a few days, to a few weeks? I am going to be bottling an IPA in 2 weeks, and am wondering when to dry hop? I’ll be using 1oz of chinook hops. Thinking either two weeks vs 1 week. Let me know what you guys think.

Additionally, two ounces is the minimum amount of hops I would use when dry hopping a five gallon batch. I typically use 2-4 oz. depending on the hop varieties I’m using and what I’m trying to achieve. I’ve found that less than two ounces doesn’t typically give me the effect I’m after.

Thanks, I think based on what I’ve been reading I will probably throw them in at 1 week. Lots of people saying >1 week might give off a grassy feel. Although, I’ve heard Chinook hops may take a little longer to give off their aroma. Unfortunately, I only 1oz, but I will know for next time. Thanks!

  • Jeff

Dry hopping adds hop aroma without additional bittering. It’s an important characteristic of IPAs, most pale ales, bitters, and most any beer that doesn’t depend on yeast character. I’ve dry hopped a few lagers.

I typically add an ounce of Cascades to my IPAs for the last week of primary, then cold crash, transfer to a keg with an ounce or two of cascades, and store at about 35 F. The cold temperature slows the release of the hop aroma and prevents fading of the dry hop character.

I prefer to add pellets to the primary, whole hops in a muslin bag to the keg. In the absence of a muslin bag, a (clean) sock works well.

Since you’re bottling, I’d recommend two ounces for a week. When you experience the fresh dry hop aroma, then see it fade within a few weeks, you’ll understand another reason kegging is an improvement.

I dry hop for 1-2 weeks in the secondary and up to 2 months in a keg. I never get any of the mythical “grassiness”. I think that has more to do with hop variety and quality than anything else.

[quote=“Denny”]I dry hop for 1-2 weeks in the secondary and up to 2 months in a keg. I never get any of the mythical “grassiness”. I think that has more to do with hop variety and quality than anything else.[/quote]Agreed. The only time I got grassy from it was with whole hops in a Randall. I DH strictly with pellets now.

It fades that fast in bottles, in the fridge?

[quote=“jeffsmietana”]Thanks, I think based on what I’ve been reading I will probably throw them in at 1 week. Lots of people saying >1 week might give off a grassy feel. Although, I’ve heard Chinook hops may take a little longer to give off their aroma. Unfortunately, I only 1oz, but I will know for next time. Thanks!

  • Jeff[/quote]

Do you have any other hops to add with the 1 oz. of chinook? Cascade, centennial, columbus, amarillo, simcoe?

Just the chinook (1oz). I am brewing the Chinook IPA kit. Supposed to be a good brew, time will tell. This is the second time I’ve brewed. The first came out great!

  • Jeff

Do you feel that holds true at room temperature as well?
Or kegs in refrigeration?

(I am dh’n now at room temp, hop bag dental floss)(out of town…10 days in)

Do you feel that holds true at room temperature as well?
Or kegs in refrigeration?

(I am dh’n now at room temp, hop bag dental floss)(out of town…10 days in)[/quote]
My experience matches Denny’s, but I’ve kept the hops in kegs for up to three months, and still no “grassiness”, although the flavor wasn’t as fresh then as I wanted either, it had already started to fade a bit.

In fact, the only time I’ve had issues with dry hopping is when I tried to dry hop a pilsner with saaz - bad idea. Good hop, but doesn’t taste good as a dry hop.

Do you feel that holds true at room temperature as well?
Or kegs in refrigeration?

(I am dh’n now at room temp, hop bag dental floss)(out of town…10 days in)[/quote]

Kegs are in the fridge, but it’s also true for room temp.

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