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Dry Genshu with Different Yeast

Very excited to report that my first attempt at homebrewing sake turned out a very complex, dry, high alcohol content with fruity banana melon undertones. This was done dispite having had used WYeast’s Pasteur Champagne Yeast rather than using a traditional Sake variety. Was this beginner’s luck because of temperature control or has anyone else here experimented with this mixed strain of yeast?

Reason for this was that sake was my first attempt at homebrewing and the local shop only had a few Activator Packs and Pasteur Champagne Yeast was the most obvious choice available due to its statistics for low temperature tolerance and high alcohol survival.

Here is the catalog quote:
"Wyeast 4021 Champagne
SKU: Y4021

Wyeast 4021 Champagne ferments crisp and dry. Used in: Dry White Wines, Spumante, Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Pinot Blanc, Gewurtztraminer.
.
Used in many white wine fermentations and also some red wines. Also used for secondary fermentation of barley wine. Ferments crisp and dry, ideal for base wines in champagne making. Low foaming, excellent barrel fermentation, good flocculating characteristics. Dry White Wines, Spumante, Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Pinot Blanc, Gewurtztraminer. Temperature Range: 55-75 F. Alcohol Tolerance: 17%."

Now compare this to Wyeast 4134 Sake #9:

Wyeast 4134 Sake #9
SKU: Y4134

Wyeast 4134 Sake #9, sake yeast, has a full bodied profile with true Sake character.

Sake yeast #9 used in conjunction with Koji for making a wide variety of Asian Jius (rice based beverages). Full bodied profile with true Sake character. Use for sake, nigori, dai ginjo, fruit, plum wine, rice beer. Temperature Range: 60-75 F. Alcohol Tolerance: 16%.

My question is how off was my flavor using a similar but untraditional yeast in my sake? Did I create something very different? (It tasted great, but did scare me earlier on because of the harsh wine aroma which all but completely vanished upon Yodan anyway!)

You’re not the first to substitute champagne yeast when a sake strain is unavailable. It works just fine, just with different esters produced by the yeast.

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