Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Differences between Saflager 34/70 and WLP830

Since this are technically the same strain I was wondering if there are differences anyone has noticed between using the 34/70 and WLP830. The plan is to make a German pilsner and the idea of not having to make a starter and just direct pitching 2-3 packets of dry seems much more appealing. I want to make the best beer possible so if going with liquid would give me even a slightly superior product I’d rather do that.

Please share your thoughts and experiences.

Unfortunately I don’t believe I have used the WLP830 yet. I really haven’t had any need to, either, as I just LOVE the 34/70. It turns out great, and like you say, you can just throw a few packs in and be done with it. Actually for a small batch brewer like me (1.7 gallons!), a single pack of dry yeast is perfect for this. So I don’t know if I’ll ever get around to WLP830. Dry yeast is way too convenient, and the results perfectly tasty.

If you are anywhere close in terms of pitch rate, I would highly recommend rehydrating 34/70.

Definitely planned on rehydrating but since this will be my first time rehydrating yeast I was curious. Most people say to pitch liquid lager yeast at or below fermenting temps. How would I do this with rehydrated dry yeast? Stick it in the fridge for a while? Or is this just not that important?

I treat dry yeast just like liquid yeast. Pitch below fermentation temperature then let rise up.

Except I don’t rehydrate. If your beer tastes excellent and wins awards without rehydrating, why bother.

I did a Helles and couldn’t build up enough 830 for 10 gallons in time so pitched half with WLP830 (did do a 3 liter starter on a stirplate) and the other half got 2 packets of 34/70. If there were any difference in the beer I couldn’t detect them, only difference I noticed was the 34/70 seemed to take slightly longer to clear but after proper amount of lagering time both were clear. I haven’t needed it since but in the future I’ll be using 34/70 vs. taking the time to build up enough 830.

did you direct pitch the 34/70 or did you rehydrate?

I made my first German pilsner several months ago with 34/70 and it turned out great. I chucked in one pack (3 gallon batch) at 3 pm and had it fermenting by the next morning at 50f. O G 1.049, F G 1.009. I’ve never used Wlp830 and probably won’t.
I also made an octoberfest back in march with S-189 that is fantastic.

Definitely a big fan of 34/70. Made a CAP earlier this year with it. Pitched two rehydrated packs in a 1.054 beer. Turned around several weeks later and reused the yeast to make a Vienna lager. IMO, I think that it is a more malt forward yeast which played really well for my Vienna. I might try it soon with an Octoberfest.

did you direct pitch the 34/70 or did you rehydrate?[/quote]
Not 100% certain and I don’t have it in my brew notes but I think I actually rehydrated for that batch. I typically don’t bother rehydrating dry yeast but I think I wanted to make sure I was pitching plenty of yeast so I took the time to rehydrate the 2 packets.

[quote=“dmtaylo2”]I treat dry yeast just like liquid yeast. Pitch below fermentation temperature then let rise up.

Except I don’t rehydrate. If your beer tastes excellent and wins awards without rehydrating, why bother.[/quote]

we direct pitched (no rehydrate) four sachets of 34/70 into our 14 gallons of bo pils and we almost certainly underpitched. If we had rehydrated those, we probably wouldn’t have underpitched. If you want to use 2 sachets per 5 gallons as Denny does, I agree with this. If you are ‘close’, rehydrate the yeast, if not, sprinkle away. I’m not sure why this is so controversial.

If I was only using 4 packs in 14 gallons, hell, even I would rehydrate. So I’ll agree with the “if you’re close” guidance, that’s good.

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com