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Cutting off the end of a cornie downtube

can I cut thru a stainless cornie downtube with one of those inexpensive manual tubing cutters that work so well on copper tubing…or am I gonna have to replace the dremel I lost in a move two and a half years ago to get this done?

Not a problem it will work great.

I don’t see a reason to cut the tube. 1 glass will have a large amount of sediment to it. After that, as long as you don’t move the keg it will stay clear.

And if you do move it after cutting, likely you will still get a glass of sediment.

I used a tubing cutter on my kegs. I had and have no problems. I cut about 3/8 to 1/2 inch off the tube,sounds like a lot to cut off but for me it is just enough. I don’t go through a keg real fast and have not picked up any sediment.

Did the same when I needed a dip tube for my Sanke fermenter with a corny top. Tubing cutter worked just fine.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]I don’t see a reason to cut the tube. 1 glass will have a large amount of sediment to it. After that, as long as you don’t move the keg it will stay clear.

And if you do move it after cutting, likely you will still get a glass of sediment.[/quote]

I’ve had to cut replacement tubes, they hit the bottom.

[quote=“mrv”][quote=“Nighthawk”]I don’t see a reason to cut the tube. 1 glass will have a large amount of sediment to it. After that, as long as you don’t move the keg it will stay clear.

And if you do move it after cutting, likely you will still get a glass of sediment.[/quote]

I’ve had to cut replacement tubes, they hit the bottom.[/quote]

Well, of course that is a reason.

To avoid yeast/sediment… Non issue IMO.

:wink:

Unless you did, as an experiment, your primary ferment in a couple of cornies, then you might have enough yeast and hop trub at the bottom that you couldnt push it through even with the gas turned up to 30 psi.

Why would somebody do that? Is a pretty valid question. A pretty great brewer and poster here, Tom Gardner, (TG here, IIRC) has posted he does this regularly and I was out of fermenters and thought, what the hell?

[quote=“denverbrewhoo”]Unless you did, as an experiment, your primary ferment in a couple of cornies, then you might have enough yeast and hop trub at the bottom that you couldnt push it through even with the gas turned up to 30 psi.

Why would somebody do that? Is a pretty valid question. A pretty great brewer and poster here, Tom Gardner, (TG here, IIRC) has posted he does this regularly and I was out of fermenters and thought, what the hell?[/quote]

You didn’t mention you were fermenting in a corny. 2nd valid reason.

well I didn’t know I had to not only a) ask my question but also b) establish the reasonable-ness and validity of asking the question, in order to get an answer! :smiley:

( I do remember people asking about fly-sparging techniques and getting long expositions about why batch sparging is better and they shouldn’t mess with fly sparging, or asking about the ins and outs of triple-decoctions only to have it patiently explained to them that a single infusion is all you really need to do, so I should have been prepared!)

A third reason is that after 59 years of high-protein diet and 45 years of alcohol consumption including 10 of drinking yeasty homebrews, I’m prone to gout flare-ups which if you ever had one you’d be interested in not having any more than strictly necessary, and brewing yeast, which is about 45% protein, high-purine and therefore prone to elevating uric acid levels, is something it pays for me to scrupulously avoid. But filtration is the better way to go so I’m not likely to cut off all my cornie downtubes, just this one and maybe a couple more.

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