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Cilantro lime ale

I am looking for recipe/recommendations to make a cilantro lime ale. I brew from extract kits.

Yummy! Okay, so just make the beer and ferment it out like normal. Then on the day before bottling/kegging, collect the zest from a lime or two (i.e., sort of shred the green outer peel with a fork or “zester” or cut it up into tiny bits with a knife), and chop up a head of cilantro, and then… this is so easy… soak it in like 4-6 ounces of vodka overnight. The next day, or even in as little as ~6 hours, the vodka will taste awesome like lime and cilantro. Then just add the liquid vodka to your finished beer, leaving the zest and spent cilantro solids behind. And you’re done – simply bottle or keg as normal.

This works for all sorts of different spices, and there ain’t a better technique on earth, I’m telling you the truth. I use the same technique for my locally famous jalapeno porter. Soak the jalapenos on bottling day, and whammo. I never thought to add lime and cilantro, but dang, that’s not such a terrible idea!

Not sure about this combo, but at the recent Vancouver Beerfest I had a lime kolsch that was pretty good.

Use lime zest.

Not sure about this combo, but at the recent Vancouver Beerfest I had a lime kolsch that was pretty good.[/quote]

Was that the Burnside Lime Kolsch?

Not sure about this combo, but at the recent Vancouver Beerfest I had a lime kolsch that was pretty good.[/quote]

Was that the Burnside Lime Kolsch?[/quote]

Yes, indeed.

I agree that I would add any ‘flavor’ post-fermentation (either secondary or bottling bucket) so that the flavors you want in the beer are preserved and haven’t been scorched by the heat of the brewpot or scrubbed out in primary. For reference, I used the zest of one lemon in a recent “summer ale” and the amount was faint but very good and exactly what I was looking for. It’s possible that the zest of one lime (or 1½ limes since limes are smaller) would be perfect for 5 gallons. The tough part is the cilantro because it could be tricky to tell how much to use. I would probably measure out about a cup or less and shred it up good or maybe even use a food processor. I also agree that you want to add the zest and cilantro to some vodka (to sanitize) and then add that whole mess to the secondary (preferred) or bottling bucket. I like the idea of secondary here because you would get all the flavor you want but the solids would fall to the bottom and you could avoid getting them in your bottles. Also, if you really want to do it up righteous, get yourself some key limes. They are smaller but much better tasting than the standard limes we usually see… Persian limes. Occasionally we get key limes by the bag and they are outrageously good. Cheers.

Well I can’t imagine what cilantro would taste like in beer but what do I know? I agree with the previous poster who advised you to make a tincture with vodka then add that the the beer. By the way, make damn sure you only get the zest of the lime, that white stuff underneath is very bitter and nasty. :smiley:

What?!!

Whew, for a minute there I thought you were talking about my ex-wife. :?

Pretty soon there’ll be enough of us to field a softball team, with three subs, two coaches and a bat boy.

Cilantro is the the same plant whose seeds are coriander. They share some of the same flavor components, and I love orange and coriander in a beer. So I find the idea of Cilantro in beer interesting. In general I find cilantro to be fresher tasting, less earthy. I like the aromatics of cilantro better; when I get a bunch of fresh cilantro I just want to bury my face in it and smell. Just thinking about has got my taco crave going, and It’s early morning as I write this.

Some complain that Cilantro can have medicinal flavors like soap or lotion. Crushing the leaves can minimize this and make the flavor more mild. (think pesto, but cilantro instead of basil) Given that, dmtaylo2’s technique might therefore be extra valid. Specifically, I would give the leaves a coarse chop and slight crush FIRST; then let it sit in the bowl as you zest the lime. That will give the cilantro 5-10 minutes to relax before getting it drunk. There are enzymes in the leaves that will break down the aldehydes responsible for the more potent aromas, so this will take some of the edge off.

In terms of cilantro in beer, I am slightly concerned about how well it would pair. I’d be concerned about cilantro and hops fighting, i.e. I think a cilantro IPA could be gross. I would tend to go to a lighter style, and go easy, or even avoid the aroma hops. Let us know how it goes.

[quote=“JMcK”]
In terms of cilantro in beer, I am slightly concerned about how well it would pair. I’d be concerned about cilantro and hops fighting, i.e. I think a cilantro IPA could be gross. I would tend to go to a lighter style, and go easy, or even avoid the aroma hops. Let us know how it goes.[/quote]
Agreed. This is why I like to hop a ‘flavored’ beer only once at 60 minutes and no more. The hops are there to do their balancing of the beer but then the stage should be empty for the ‘flavor’ to make its appearance in the finish. This is true of almost any flavor I would add to a beer… smoke, raspberry, vanilla, cinnamon, pumpkin pie spice, lemon, oak, etc.

suggest you research the Witbier style. Drink a few examples of it. Perhaps that is the route you are looking for

(think Bluemoon, Hoegarden, etc and think coriander/orange–similar to what you are talking about).

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