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Ch Milk Stout Final Gravity

Am I missing something or does NB not list their estimated Final Gravity anywhere for the kits ? I have the Chocolate Milk Stout in the Fermentator now and it is at 1.02 which seems high. It would be nice to know where this should be when done. I am assuming because of the Lactose it is going ot be a little high.

I would expect the lactose to add somewhat to the non-fermentable sugars in the recipe - I don’t know that specific kit, but 1.020 is a bit on the high side for finishing, unless there is a ton of lactose in that kit. I would expect it to get down near 1.012 if the lactose is no more than a pound in a 5 gallon batch of relatively low starting gravity (1.046 or lower).

:cheers:

A pound of lactose in 5 gal will add about 8 “points”, so 1.020 is right about where I’d expect it to finish.

This is probably why NB doesn’t publish a suggested FG, FWIW. Unless you do something seriously wrong, like freezing it, the beer is going to finish about where it should. New brewers tend to freak out about minor variations.

I have that one in the secondary and mine finished at 1.029 but it started at 1.062. I’ve brewed a lot of stouts with lactose and I think the lowest I ever got was 1.024.

If you don’t put the lactose in the boil but add it in the secondary your gravity will be a lot lower.

I’m surprised that it would make a difference. The increased osmotic pressure could cause the yeast to flocculate earlier, but we’re talking about a pretty minor variation all things considered.

It could be stratification of the beer and sugar syrup.

I’ve had that one finish between 1.025 and 1.035, and in talking to NB, they say that’s what they expect.

This kit was my first brew ever. I did substitute the Wyeast in the kit with White Labs Irish Ale WLP004

I hit the OG dead on per instructions and ended up with a final 1.021

It’s been a great beer so far. Everyone likes it, even my girlfriend’s uncle who owned a craft beer/wine shop in St. Louis.

I’m surprised that it would make a difference. The increased osmotic pressure could cause the yeast to flocculate earlier, but we’re talking about a pretty minor variation all things considered.

It could be stratification of the beer and sugar syrup.[/quote]

I’ve never tried doing it that way but I was always going to, don’t remember who told me that.

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