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Carbonating individual bottles with pipette

I’ve heard of people carbonating each bottle individually with a pipette. I am trying to get about 1.8 volumes of CO2.

So if i make a priming sugar solution for 10 gallons. how much sugar would i add to each bottle individually by the drop? (for 12oz bottles AND 22oz bottles) is there an easy way to go about this? i know it will take more time, but that is not a concern for me

Just curious, why not just make up a sugar water solution and stir in with your beer in the bottling bucket? Why spend the time to put drops in each bottle individually?

Priming bottles is my preferred method for bottle conditioning. Easiest way is to just weigh the correct amount of dry sugar per bottle and add with a small funnel rather than making a syrup.

whenever i use the priming sugar in the bottling bucket i get inconsistent carbonation. I wanted something a little more reliable. and consistent bottle to bottle. (this is the first batch i’ve bottled in a long time, and i plan on giving a lot of it to friends and family)

I was hoping you’d respond :cheers:

so according the NB priming calculator, I need 129.27 grams for 10 gallons. So thats 1280oz total/12oz bottles/ 129.27grams = .825 grams per 12oz bottle? am i doing that right? does that sound right?

no risk of infection with just the sugar?

[quote=“S.Scoggin”] = .825 grams per 12oz bottle? am i doing that right? does that sound right?
no risk of infection with just the sugar?[/quote]Seems right to me, and while there’s probably a little more risk of an infection with dry sugar versus basically none with a syrup boiled for 15 minutes, the low pH and ABV of the beer combined with the sanitary nature of the sugar itself make me not worry at all about dry priming. Plus, the peace of mind knowing that each bottle has the correct amount of sugar is worth any tiny risk, at least to me.

[quote=“Shadetree”]
Seems right to me, and while there’s probably a little more risk of an infection with dry sugar versus basically none with a syrup boiled for 15 minutes, the low pH and ABV of the beer combined with the sanitary nature of the sugar itself make me not worry at all about dry priming. Plus, the peace of mind knowing that each bottle has the correct amount of sugar is worth any tiny risk, at least to me.[/quote]

Sounds good to me! thanks for your help. I’ve been meaning to create this thread for a while; knowing there are members on this forum who do this (you).

thanks again. your help is always appreciated :cheers:

You’re welcome! I’m always supportive of trying to make bottling easier - I like kegging, and won’t go back to the days of bottling 30 gallons at one time, but I don’t think that bottling five gallons should be viewed as an onerous task to be avoided.

129 g * 12 fl oz / 1280 fl oz = 1.21 g/bottle

I have kegged since the start, with exception of very first two batches, and decided I would like to have some 22ozrs on hand. I bottled a petite Saison and my Dead Guy IV by using table sugar in the bottles. I don’t recall the amount I used for each though. But I do remember wanting to have a better correlation between my measuring spoon and the weight it holds of table sugar for the next time I do it.
I don’t think my old digital scale is very accurate in the low range. Both of the batches are much more carbonated than I wanted so I know I made a slight error somewhere.
It worked pretty slick, on bottling day I racked from the primary bucket to a corny as a bottle filler. I attached a piece of racking cane to the faucet and pressurized just barely enough to push the beer into the bottle with the racking cane outlet below beer level to minimize aeration.
On the end of the racking cane pushed into the faucet I put a nice chamfer on the inside edge to reduce disturbance and possible aeration.

I will definitely go that route again though.

[quote=“a10t2”]129 g * 12 fl oz / 1280 fl oz = 1.21 g/bottle[/quote]Yeah, that’s a better answer, didn’t notice that he had divided by the sugar weight rather than the other way around. :cheers:

That makes more sense. I’m not too keen on math. thanks!

That makes more sense. I’m not too keen on math. thanks![/quote]

Always best to not attempt math if beer is within arms length. :wink:

:cheers:

[quote=“StormyBrew”]
Always best to not attempt math if beer is within arms length. :wink:

:cheers: [/quote]

hahah. Wise words :cheers:

I keg but always bottle a few since I brew 6 gal batches. I just put 5 oz of corn sugar in a measuring cup and then add enough water to make 1 cup. I then boil it in the microwave for a few minutes. Since 1 cup = 48 tsp, I dose each bottle with 1 tsp using a medicine dropper/syringe I got from the drug store. For 22 oz bottles, I just use 1 1/2 tsp or so. I even used this method prior to kegging since I never liked the idea of transferring the beer to a botttling bucket for fear of infection.

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